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Coronavirus Disease 2019 and the Thyroid - Progress and Perspectives.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2021; 12:708333.FE

Abstract

SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) is currently a tremendous global health problem. COVID-19 causes considerable damage to a wide range of vital organs most prominently the respiratory system. Recently, clinical evidence for thyroidal insults during and after COVID-19 has been accumulated. As of today, almost all non-neoplastic thyroid diseases, i.e., Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, subacute, painless and postpartum thyroiditis, have been reported as a complication of COVID-19, and causality by the virus has been strongly implicated in all of them. Similar thyroid problems have been reported in the past with the SARS-CoV outbreak in 2002. In this review, we briefly look back at the reported evidence of alteration in thyroid functionality and thyroid diseases associated with SARS-CoV and then proceed to examine the issue with COVID-19 in detail, which is then followed by an in-depth discussion regarding a pathogenetic link between Coronavirus infection and thyroid disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The First Department of Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan. Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Japanese Red Cross Wakayama Medical Center, Wakayama, Japan.Diabetes Center, Aizawa Hospital, Matsumoto, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34276567

Citation

Inaba, Hidefumi, and Toru Aizawa. "Coronavirus Disease 2019 and the Thyroid - Progress and Perspectives." Frontiers in Endocrinology, vol. 12, 2021, p. 708333.
Inaba H, Aizawa T. Coronavirus Disease 2019 and the Thyroid - Progress and Perspectives. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2021;12:708333.
Inaba, H., & Aizawa, T. (2021). Coronavirus Disease 2019 and the Thyroid - Progress and Perspectives. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 12, 708333. https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2021.708333
Inaba H, Aizawa T. Coronavirus Disease 2019 and the Thyroid - Progress and Perspectives. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2021;12:708333. PubMed PMID: 34276567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coronavirus Disease 2019 and the Thyroid - Progress and Perspectives. AU - Inaba,Hidefumi, AU - Aizawa,Toru, Y1 - 2021/06/24/ PY - 2021/05/11/received PY - 2021/06/07/accepted PY - 2021/7/19/entrez PY - 2021/7/20/pubmed PY - 2021/7/31/medline KW - SARS-CoV KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - autoimmunity KW - coronavirus KW - cytokine storm KW - hyperinflammatory syndrome KW - thyroid gland SP - 708333 EP - 708333 JF - Frontiers in endocrinology JO - Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) VL - 12 N2 - SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) is currently a tremendous global health problem. COVID-19 causes considerable damage to a wide range of vital organs most prominently the respiratory system. Recently, clinical evidence for thyroidal insults during and after COVID-19 has been accumulated. As of today, almost all non-neoplastic thyroid diseases, i.e., Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, subacute, painless and postpartum thyroiditis, have been reported as a complication of COVID-19, and causality by the virus has been strongly implicated in all of them. Similar thyroid problems have been reported in the past with the SARS-CoV outbreak in 2002. In this review, we briefly look back at the reported evidence of alteration in thyroid functionality and thyroid diseases associated with SARS-CoV and then proceed to examine the issue with COVID-19 in detail, which is then followed by an in-depth discussion regarding a pathogenetic link between Coronavirus infection and thyroid disease. SN - 1664-2392 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34276567/Coronavirus_Disease_2019_and_the_Thyroid_-_Progress_and_Perspectives. L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2021.708333 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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