Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Evaluating Effectiveness of YouTube Videos for Teaching Medical Students CPR: Solution to Optimizing Clinician Educator Workload during the COVID-19 Pandemic.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 07 02; 18(13)IJ

Abstract

(1) Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using a pre-existing video on CPR to support preclinical resuscitation education for medical students; (2) Methods: In total, 129 students selected to learn CPR using a pre-existing YouTube video or the conventional screencast video by their university faculties. All students responded to the pre- and post-training multiple-choice questionnaire on the basic knowledge of CPR, and, based on their responses, an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to assess the comparability of effectiveness across learning modalities. (3) Results: Among the students, 49 (38.0%) students selected the YouTube video to learn about CPR and were treated as the intervention group. The mean pre-test scores and post-test scores of the YouTube and the instructor's video groups were 6.43 and 6.64, and 9.06 and 9.09, respectively. After controlling for the pre-test score effects, the results of ANCOVA did not show statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.927), indicating comparable performance between groups that used YouTube and the instructor's videos. (4) Conclusion: Utilizing YouTube videos is a useful teaching strategy for teaching CPR knowledge, which would reduce the burden on faculty of creating screencast lecture videos for online learning on resuscitation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki 036-8562, Japan.Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki 036-8562, Japan.Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02114, USA.Japan Resuscitation Council, Tokyo 151-0053, Japan.Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki 036-8562, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34281050

Citation

Nomura, Osamu, et al. "Evaluating Effectiveness of YouTube Videos for Teaching Medical Students CPR: Solution to Optimizing Clinician Educator Workload During the COVID-19 Pandemic." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 18, no. 13, 2021.
Nomura O, Irie J, Park Y, et al. Evaluating Effectiveness of YouTube Videos for Teaching Medical Students CPR: Solution to Optimizing Clinician Educator Workload during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18(13).
Nomura, O., Irie, J., Park, Y., Nonogi, H., & Hanada, H. (2021). Evaluating Effectiveness of YouTube Videos for Teaching Medical Students CPR: Solution to Optimizing Clinician Educator Workload during the COVID-19 Pandemic. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(13). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137113
Nomura O, et al. Evaluating Effectiveness of YouTube Videos for Teaching Medical Students CPR: Solution to Optimizing Clinician Educator Workload During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 07 2;18(13) PubMed PMID: 34281050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating Effectiveness of YouTube Videos for Teaching Medical Students CPR: Solution to Optimizing Clinician Educator Workload during the COVID-19 Pandemic. AU - Nomura,Osamu, AU - Irie,Jin, AU - Park,Yoonsoo, AU - Nonogi,Hiroshi, AU - Hanada,Hiroyuki, Y1 - 2021/07/02/ PY - 2021/05/28/received PY - 2021/06/24/revised PY - 2021/06/28/accepted PY - 2021/7/20/entrez PY - 2021/7/21/pubmed PY - 2021/7/23/medline KW - COVID-19 pandemic KW - CPR KW - YouTube KW - education KW - medical students JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 18 IS - 13 N2 - (1) Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using a pre-existing video on CPR to support preclinical resuscitation education for medical students; (2) Methods: In total, 129 students selected to learn CPR using a pre-existing YouTube video or the conventional screencast video by their university faculties. All students responded to the pre- and post-training multiple-choice questionnaire on the basic knowledge of CPR, and, based on their responses, an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to assess the comparability of effectiveness across learning modalities. (3) Results: Among the students, 49 (38.0%) students selected the YouTube video to learn about CPR and were treated as the intervention group. The mean pre-test scores and post-test scores of the YouTube and the instructor's video groups were 6.43 and 6.64, and 9.06 and 9.09, respectively. After controlling for the pre-test score effects, the results of ANCOVA did not show statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.927), indicating comparable performance between groups that used YouTube and the instructor's videos. (4) Conclusion: Utilizing YouTube videos is a useful teaching strategy for teaching CPR knowledge, which would reduce the burden on faculty of creating screencast lecture videos for online learning on resuscitation. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34281050/Evaluating_Effectiveness_of_YouTube_Videos_for_Teaching_Medical_Students_CPR:_Solution_to_Optimizing_Clinician_Educator_Workload_during_the_COVID-19_Pandemic. L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph18137113 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -