Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Structural insights into the distinctive RNA recognition and therapeutic potentials of RIG-I-like receptors.
Med Res Rev. 2021 Jul 21 [Online ahead of print]MR

Abstract

RNA viruses, including the coronavirus, develop a unique strategy to evade the host immune response by interrupting the normal function of cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs). RLRs rapidly detect atypical nucleic acids, thereby triggering the antiviral innate immune signaling cascade and subsequently activates the interferons transcription and induction of other proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Nonetheless, these receptors are manipulated by viral proteins to subvert the host immune system and sustain the infectivity and replication potential of the virus. RIG-I senses the single-stranded, double-stranded, and short double-stranded RNAs and recognizes the key signature, a 5'-triphosphate moiety, at the blunt end of the viral RNA. Meanwhile, the melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is triggered by longer double stranded RNAs, messenger RNAs lacking 2'-O-methylation in their 5'-cap, and RNA aggregates. Therefore, structural insights into the nucleic-acid-sensing and downstream signaling mechanisms of these receptors hold great promise for developing effective antiviral therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the critical roles played by RLRs in viral infections as well as their ligand recognition mechanisms. In addition, we highlight the crosstalk between the toll-like receptors and RLRs and provide a comprehensive overview of RLR-associated diseases as well as the therapeutic potential of RLRs for the development of antiviral-drugs. Moreover, we believe that these RLR-based antivirals will serve as a step toward countering the recent coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea. S&K Therapeutics, Campus Plaza 418, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea.Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea.Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea. S&K Therapeutics, Campus Plaza 418, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34287999

Citation

Batool, Maria, et al. "Structural Insights Into the Distinctive RNA Recognition and Therapeutic Potentials of RIG-I-like Receptors." Medicinal Research Reviews, 2021.
Batool M, Kim MS, Choi S. Structural insights into the distinctive RNA recognition and therapeutic potentials of RIG-I-like receptors. Med Res Rev. 2021.
Batool, M., Kim, M. S., & Choi, S. (2021). Structural insights into the distinctive RNA recognition and therapeutic potentials of RIG-I-like receptors. Medicinal Research Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1002/med.21845
Batool M, Kim MS, Choi S. Structural Insights Into the Distinctive RNA Recognition and Therapeutic Potentials of RIG-I-like Receptors. Med Res Rev. 2021 Jul 21; PubMed PMID: 34287999.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Structural insights into the distinctive RNA recognition and therapeutic potentials of RIG-I-like receptors. AU - Batool,Maria, AU - Kim,Moon Suk, AU - Choi,Sangdun, Y1 - 2021/07/21/ PY - 2021/06/11/revised PY - 2020/12/09/received PY - 2021/07/04/accepted PY - 2021/7/21/entrez PY - 2021/7/22/pubmed PY - 2021/7/22/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - MDA5 KW - RIG-I KW - RIG-I-like receptor KW - antivirals KW - coronavirus JF - Medicinal research reviews JO - Med Res Rev N2 - RNA viruses, including the coronavirus, develop a unique strategy to evade the host immune response by interrupting the normal function of cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs). RLRs rapidly detect atypical nucleic acids, thereby triggering the antiviral innate immune signaling cascade and subsequently activates the interferons transcription and induction of other proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Nonetheless, these receptors are manipulated by viral proteins to subvert the host immune system and sustain the infectivity and replication potential of the virus. RIG-I senses the single-stranded, double-stranded, and short double-stranded RNAs and recognizes the key signature, a 5'-triphosphate moiety, at the blunt end of the viral RNA. Meanwhile, the melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is triggered by longer double stranded RNAs, messenger RNAs lacking 2'-O-methylation in their 5'-cap, and RNA aggregates. Therefore, structural insights into the nucleic-acid-sensing and downstream signaling mechanisms of these receptors hold great promise for developing effective antiviral therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the critical roles played by RLRs in viral infections as well as their ligand recognition mechanisms. In addition, we highlight the crosstalk between the toll-like receptors and RLRs and provide a comprehensive overview of RLR-associated diseases as well as the therapeutic potential of RLRs for the development of antiviral-drugs. Moreover, we believe that these RLR-based antivirals will serve as a step toward countering the recent coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. SN - 1098-1128 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34287999/Structural_insights_into_the_distinctive_RNA_recognition_and_therapeutic_potentials_of_RIG-I-like_receptors. L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/med.21845 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.