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National surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline and other comparator antibiotics and serotype distribution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in adults: results from the Surveillance of Multicenter Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) programme in 2017-2020.
J Glob Antimicrob Resist. 2021 09; 26:308-316.JG

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to investigate the trends in serotypes and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) to dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline and other comparator antibiotics from 2017-2020 following implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) and during the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic.

METHODS

During the study period, 237 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from non-duplicate patients, covering 15.0% of IPD cases in Taiwan. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using a Sensititre® system. A latex agglutination method (ImmuLex™ Pneumotest Kit) was used to determine serotypes.

RESULTS

Susceptibility rates were high for vancomycin (100%), teicoplanin (100%) and linezolid (100%), followed by ceftaroline (non-meningitis) (98.3%), moxifloxacin (94.9%) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (89.9%). MIC50 and MIC90 values of dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline and omadacycline were generally low. Non-vaccine serotype 23A was the leading cause of IPD across the adult age range. Isolates of serotype 15B were slightly fewer than those of PCV-13 serotypes in patients aged ≥65 years. The overall case fatality rate was 15.2% (36/237) but was especially high for non-PCV-13 serotype 15B (21.4%; 3/14). Vaccine coverage was 44.7% for PCV-13 and 49.4% for the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV-23), but was 57% for both PCV-13 and PPSV-23.

CONCLUSION

The incidence of IPD was stationary after PCV-13 introduction and only dramatically decreased in the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline were generally low for S. pneumoniae causing adult IPD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan, and Institute of Genomics and Bioinformatics, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.Department of Pediatrics, Hsin-Chu Branch, National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, Taoyuan General Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taoyuan, Taiwan, and School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Taipei City Hospital, and National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital and Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, and MacKay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, and Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan.Infection Control Center, Chi Mei Hospital, Liouying, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, St Joseph's Hospital, Yunlin County, Taiwan; MacKay Junior College of Medicine, Nursing, and Management, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. Electronic address: hsporen@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34289409

Citation

Chien, Ying-Chun, et al. "National Surveillance of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities to Dalbavancin, Telavancin, Tedizolid, Eravacycline, Omadacycline and Other Comparator Antibiotics and Serotype Distribution of Invasive Streptococcus Pneumoniae Isolates in Adults: Results From the Surveillance of Multicenter Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) Programme in 2017-2020." Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, vol. 26, 2021, pp. 308-316.
Chien YC, Lee YL, Liu PY, et al. National surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline and other comparator antibiotics and serotype distribution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in adults: results from the Surveillance of Multicenter Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) programme in 2017-2020. J Glob Antimicrob Resist. 2021;26:308-316.
Chien, Y. C., Lee, Y. L., Liu, P. Y., Lu, M. C., Shao, P. L., Lu, P. L., Cheng, S. H., Lin, C. Y., Wu, T. S., Yen, M. Y., Wang, L. S., Liu, C. P., Lee, W. S., Shi, Z. Y., Chen, Y. S., Wang, F. D., Tseng, S. H., Chen, Y. H., Sheng, W. H., ... Hsueh, P. R. (2021). National surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline and other comparator antibiotics and serotype distribution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in adults: results from the Surveillance of Multicenter Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) programme in 2017-2020. Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, 26, 308-316. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jgar.2021.07.005
Chien YC, et al. National Surveillance of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities to Dalbavancin, Telavancin, Tedizolid, Eravacycline, Omadacycline and Other Comparator Antibiotics and Serotype Distribution of Invasive Streptococcus Pneumoniae Isolates in Adults: Results From the Surveillance of Multicenter Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) Programme in 2017-2020. J Glob Antimicrob Resist. 2021;26:308-316. PubMed PMID: 34289409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - National surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline and other comparator antibiotics and serotype distribution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in adults: results from the Surveillance of Multicenter Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) programme in 2017-2020. AU - Chien,Ying-Chun, AU - Lee,Yu-Lin, AU - Liu,Po-Yu, AU - Lu,Min-Chi, AU - Shao,Pei-Lan, AU - Lu,Po-Liang, AU - Cheng,Shu-Hsing, AU - Lin,Chi-Ying, AU - Wu,Ting-Shu, AU - Yen,Muh-Yong, AU - Wang,Lih-Shinn, AU - Liu,Chang-Pan, AU - Lee,Wen-Sen, AU - Shi,Zhi-Yuan, AU - Chen,Yao-Shen, AU - Wang,Fu-Der, AU - Tseng,Shu-Hui, AU - Chen,Yu-Hui, AU - Sheng,Wang-Huei, AU - Lee,Chun-Ming, AU - Chen,Yen-Hsu, AU - Ko,Wen-Chien, AU - Hsueh,Po-Ren, Y1 - 2021/07/18/ PY - 2021/05/07/received PY - 2021/06/27/revised PY - 2021/07/07/accepted PY - 2021/7/22/pubmed PY - 2021/9/23/medline PY - 2021/7/21/entrez KW - Antimicrobial susceptibility KW - Case fatality rate KW - Pneumococcal vaccine KW - Serotype KW - Streptococcus pneumoniae KW - Taiwan SP - 308 EP - 316 JF - Journal of global antimicrobial resistance JO - J Glob Antimicrob Resist VL - 26 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the trends in serotypes and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) to dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline and other comparator antibiotics from 2017-2020 following implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) and during the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic. METHODS: During the study period, 237 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from non-duplicate patients, covering 15.0% of IPD cases in Taiwan. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using a Sensititre® system. A latex agglutination method (ImmuLex™ Pneumotest Kit) was used to determine serotypes. RESULTS: Susceptibility rates were high for vancomycin (100%), teicoplanin (100%) and linezolid (100%), followed by ceftaroline (non-meningitis) (98.3%), moxifloxacin (94.9%) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (89.9%). MIC50 and MIC90 values of dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline and omadacycline were generally low. Non-vaccine serotype 23A was the leading cause of IPD across the adult age range. Isolates of serotype 15B were slightly fewer than those of PCV-13 serotypes in patients aged ≥65 years. The overall case fatality rate was 15.2% (36/237) but was especially high for non-PCV-13 serotype 15B (21.4%; 3/14). Vaccine coverage was 44.7% for PCV-13 and 49.4% for the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV-23), but was 57% for both PCV-13 and PPSV-23. CONCLUSION: The incidence of IPD was stationary after PCV-13 introduction and only dramatically decreased in the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of dalbavancin, telavancin, tedizolid, eravacycline, omadacycline were generally low for S. pneumoniae causing adult IPD. SN - 2213-7173 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34289409/National_surveillance_of_antimicrobial_susceptibilities_to_dalbavancin,_telavancin,_tedizolid,_eravacycline,_omadacycline_and_other_comparator_antibiotics_and_serotype_distribution_of_invasive_Streptococcus_pneumoniae_isolates_in_adults:_results_from_the_Surveillance_of_Multicenter_Antimicrobial_Resistance_in_Taiwan_(SMART)_programme_in_2017-2020. L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2213-7165(21)00174-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -