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A perspective on hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection control of COVID-19: usefulness of spatial separation between wards and airborne isolation unit.
J Breath Res. 2021 07 30; 15(4)JB

Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed a considerable burden on hospitals and healthcare workers (HCWs) worldwide, increasing the risk of outbreaks and nosocomial transmission to 'non-COVID-19' patients, who represent the highest-risk population in terms of mortality, and HCWs. Since HCWs are at the interface between hospitals on the one hand and the community on the other, they are potential reservoirs, carriers, or victims of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 cross-transmission. In addition, there has been a paradigm shift in the management of viral respiratory outbreaks, such as the widespread testing of patients and HCWs, including asymptomatic individuals. In hospitals, there is a risk of aerosol transmission in poorly ventilated spaces, and when performing aerosol-producing procedures, it is imperative to take measures against aerosol transmission. In particular, spatial separation of the inpatient ward for non-COVID-19 patients from that designated for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 as well as negative-pressure isolation on the floor of the ward, using an airborne infection isolation device could help prevent nosocomial infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Internal Medicine, Saitama Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.Department of General Internal Medicine, Saitama Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.Center for Advanced Emergency Medicine and Critical Care, Saitama Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Letter

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34293732

Citation

Mimura, Kazuyuki, et al. "A Perspective On Hospital-acquired (nosocomial) Infection Control of COVID-19: Usefulness of Spatial Separation Between Wards and Airborne Isolation Unit." Journal of Breath Research, vol. 15, no. 4, 2021.
Mimura K, Oka H, Sawano M. A perspective on hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection control of COVID-19: usefulness of spatial separation between wards and airborne isolation unit. J Breath Res. 2021;15(4).
Mimura, K., Oka, H., & Sawano, M. (2021). A perspective on hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection control of COVID-19: usefulness of spatial separation between wards and airborne isolation unit. Journal of Breath Research, 15(4). https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7163/ac1721
Mimura K, Oka H, Sawano M. A Perspective On Hospital-acquired (nosocomial) Infection Control of COVID-19: Usefulness of Spatial Separation Between Wards and Airborne Isolation Unit. J Breath Res. 2021 07 30;15(4) PubMed PMID: 34293732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A perspective on hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection control of COVID-19: usefulness of spatial separation between wards and airborne isolation unit. AU - Mimura,Kazuyuki, AU - Oka,Hideaki, AU - Sawano,Makoto, Y1 - 2021/07/30/ PY - 2021/07/05/received PY - 2021/07/22/accepted PY - 2021/7/23/pubmed PY - 2021/7/23/medline PY - 2021/7/22/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - airborne isolation unit KW - airborne transmission KW - hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection KW - segmentation JF - Journal of breath research JO - J Breath Res VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed a considerable burden on hospitals and healthcare workers (HCWs) worldwide, increasing the risk of outbreaks and nosocomial transmission to 'non-COVID-19' patients, who represent the highest-risk population in terms of mortality, and HCWs. Since HCWs are at the interface between hospitals on the one hand and the community on the other, they are potential reservoirs, carriers, or victims of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 cross-transmission. In addition, there has been a paradigm shift in the management of viral respiratory outbreaks, such as the widespread testing of patients and HCWs, including asymptomatic individuals. In hospitals, there is a risk of aerosol transmission in poorly ventilated spaces, and when performing aerosol-producing procedures, it is imperative to take measures against aerosol transmission. In particular, spatial separation of the inpatient ward for non-COVID-19 patients from that designated for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 as well as negative-pressure isolation on the floor of the ward, using an airborne infection isolation device could help prevent nosocomial infection. SN - 1752-7163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34293732/A_perspective_on_hospital-acquired_(nosocomial)_infection_control_of_COVID-19:_usefulness_of_spatial_separation_between_wards_and_airborne_isolation_unit. L2 - https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7163/ac1721 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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