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Increase in SARS-CoV-2 infected biomedical waste among low middle-income countries: environmental sustainability and impact with health implications.
J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol. 2021 Jul 22 [Online ahead of print]JB

Abstract

Studies have shown that severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly infectious disease, with global deaths rising to about 360,438 as of 28 May 2020. Different countries have used various approaches such as lockdown, social distancing, maintenance of personal hygiene, and increased establishment of testing and isolation centers to manage the pandemic. Poor biomedical waste (BMW) management, treatment, and disposal techniques, especially SARS-CoV-2 infected BMW, may threaten the environmental and public health in most developing countries and, by extension, impact the economic status of individuals and the nation at large. This may increase the potential for the transmission of air/blood body fluid-borne pathogens, increase the growth of microorganisms, risk of mutagenesis, and upsurge of more virulent strain. In contrast, uncontrolled substandard burning could increase the potential spread of nosocomial infection and environmental exposure to toxic organic compounds, heavy metals, radioactive, and genotoxic bio-aerosols which might be present in the gaseous, liquid, and solid by-products. The paucity of understanding of pathophysiology and management of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has also necessitated the need to put in place appropriate disposal techniques to cater for the sudden increase in the global demand for personal protective equipment (PPE) and pharmaceutical drugs to manage the pandemic and to reduce the risk of preventable infection by the waste. Therefore, there is a need for adequate sensitization, awareness, and environmental monitoring of the impacts of improper handling of SARS-CoV-2 infected BMWs. Hence, this review aimed to address the issues relating to the improper management of increased SARS-CoV-2 infected BMW in low middle-income countries (LMICs).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, Laboratory for Reproductive Biology and Developmental Programming, Edo University Iyamho, Iyamho, Nigeria.Discipline of Physiology, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.Institute of Chemical and Biotechnology, Vaal University of Technology, Southern Gauteng Science and Technology Park, Sebokeng, South Africa.Department of Microbiology, Applied Microbiology, Biotechnology and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Edo University Iyamho, Iyamho, Edo State, Nigeria.Department of Anatomy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.Department of Physiology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences, University of the Gambia, Serekunda, The Gambia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34293833

Citation

Olaniyan, Olugbemi T., et al. "Increase in SARS-CoV-2 Infected Biomedical Waste Among Low Middle-income Countries: Environmental Sustainability and Impact With Health Implications." Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology, 2021.
Olaniyan OT, Dare A, Okoli B, et al. Increase in SARS-CoV-2 infected biomedical waste among low middle-income countries: environmental sustainability and impact with health implications. J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol. 2021.
Olaniyan, O. T., Dare, A., Okoli, B., Adetunji, C. O., Ibitoye, B. O., Okotie, G. E., & Eweoya, O. (2021). Increase in SARS-CoV-2 infected biomedical waste among low middle-income countries: environmental sustainability and impact with health implications. Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology. https://doi.org/10.1515/jbcpp-2020-0533
Olaniyan OT, et al. Increase in SARS-CoV-2 Infected Biomedical Waste Among Low Middle-income Countries: Environmental Sustainability and Impact With Health Implications. J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol. 2021 Jul 22; PubMed PMID: 34293833.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increase in SARS-CoV-2 infected biomedical waste among low middle-income countries: environmental sustainability and impact with health implications. AU - Olaniyan,Olugbemi T, AU - Dare,Ayobami, AU - Okoli,Bamidele, AU - Adetunji,Charles O, AU - Ibitoye,Babatunde O, AU - Okotie,Gloria E, AU - Eweoya,Olugbenga, Y1 - 2021/07/22/ PY - 2020/05/29/received PY - 2021/06/28/accepted PY - 2021/7/22/entrez PY - 2021/7/23/pubmed PY - 2021/7/23/medline KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - biomedical waste KW - environmental impact KW - low middle-income countries KW - public health JF - Journal of basic and clinical physiology and pharmacology JO - J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol N2 - Studies have shown that severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly infectious disease, with global deaths rising to about 360,438 as of 28 May 2020. Different countries have used various approaches such as lockdown, social distancing, maintenance of personal hygiene, and increased establishment of testing and isolation centers to manage the pandemic. Poor biomedical waste (BMW) management, treatment, and disposal techniques, especially SARS-CoV-2 infected BMW, may threaten the environmental and public health in most developing countries and, by extension, impact the economic status of individuals and the nation at large. This may increase the potential for the transmission of air/blood body fluid-borne pathogens, increase the growth of microorganisms, risk of mutagenesis, and upsurge of more virulent strain. In contrast, uncontrolled substandard burning could increase the potential spread of nosocomial infection and environmental exposure to toxic organic compounds, heavy metals, radioactive, and genotoxic bio-aerosols which might be present in the gaseous, liquid, and solid by-products. The paucity of understanding of pathophysiology and management of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has also necessitated the need to put in place appropriate disposal techniques to cater for the sudden increase in the global demand for personal protective equipment (PPE) and pharmaceutical drugs to manage the pandemic and to reduce the risk of preventable infection by the waste. Therefore, there is a need for adequate sensitization, awareness, and environmental monitoring of the impacts of improper handling of SARS-CoV-2 infected BMWs. Hence, this review aimed to address the issues relating to the improper management of increased SARS-CoV-2 infected BMW in low middle-income countries (LMICs). SN - 2191-0286 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34293833/Increase_in_SARS-CoV-2_infected_biomedical_waste_among_low_middle-income_countries:_environmental_sustainability_and_impact_with_health_implications. L2 - https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/jbcpp-2020-0533 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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