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Bullying and suicide risk among sexual minority youth in the United States.
Prev Med. 2021 12; 153:106728.PM

Abstract

Bullying is associated with increased suicide risk and maladaptive development for sexual minority youth (SMY). The purpose of this study is to determine whether multiple forms of bullying mediate the relationship between biological sex and suicide risk among SMY and to determine whether sexual identity moderates these relationships (i.e., moderated mediation). Data from the 2015-2019 National Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey was analyzed using multiple group structural equation modeling with the 5967 youth that self-identified as Lesbian/Gay, Bisexual, or Not sure of their sexual identity. All forms of bullying were associated with suicide risk. After controlling for bullying, Male SMY reported less suicide risk in comparison to female SMY. Female SMY were more likely to be cyberbullied while male SMY were more likely to be threatened or injured with a weapon. Sexual identity did not moderate these relationships. These finding align with the minority stress theory which posits the victimization experiences are linked to negative mental health outcomes among minority youth. Although sexual identity did not moderate these relationships, this study reveals new mechanistic pathways influencing sex-based suicide risk disparities among SMY. Findings can inform future research and the development of suicide prevention interventions that address the unique needs of SMY occurring at the intersection of sex and sexual identity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing - Health Systems Science, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: asmit37@uic.edu.Health Promotion & Behavior in the School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34298027

Citation

Smith, Ariel U., and Dennis Reidy. "Bullying and Suicide Risk Among Sexual Minority Youth in the United States." Preventive Medicine, vol. 153, 2021, p. 106728.
Smith AU, Reidy D. Bullying and suicide risk among sexual minority youth in the United States. Prev Med. 2021;153:106728.
Smith, A. U., & Reidy, D. (2021). Bullying and suicide risk among sexual minority youth in the United States. Preventive Medicine, 153, 106728. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106728
Smith AU, Reidy D. Bullying and Suicide Risk Among Sexual Minority Youth in the United States. Prev Med. 2021;153:106728. PubMed PMID: 34298027.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bullying and suicide risk among sexual minority youth in the United States. AU - Smith,Ariel U, AU - Reidy,Dennis, Y1 - 2021/07/20/ PY - 2021/02/17/received PY - 2021/07/11/revised PY - 2021/07/14/accepted PY - 2021/7/24/pubmed PY - 2022/3/22/medline PY - 2021/7/23/entrez KW - Bullying KW - Sexual minority youth KW - Suicide risk SP - 106728 EP - 106728 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 153 N2 - Bullying is associated with increased suicide risk and maladaptive development for sexual minority youth (SMY). The purpose of this study is to determine whether multiple forms of bullying mediate the relationship between biological sex and suicide risk among SMY and to determine whether sexual identity moderates these relationships (i.e., moderated mediation). Data from the 2015-2019 National Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey was analyzed using multiple group structural equation modeling with the 5967 youth that self-identified as Lesbian/Gay, Bisexual, or Not sure of their sexual identity. All forms of bullying were associated with suicide risk. After controlling for bullying, Male SMY reported less suicide risk in comparison to female SMY. Female SMY were more likely to be cyberbullied while male SMY were more likely to be threatened or injured with a weapon. Sexual identity did not moderate these relationships. These finding align with the minority stress theory which posits the victimization experiences are linked to negative mental health outcomes among minority youth. Although sexual identity did not moderate these relationships, this study reveals new mechanistic pathways influencing sex-based suicide risk disparities among SMY. Findings can inform future research and the development of suicide prevention interventions that address the unique needs of SMY occurring at the intersection of sex and sexual identity. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34298027/Bullying_and_suicide_risk_among_sexual_minority_youth_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(21)00297-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -