Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A human cell-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibody responses and protects mice from SARS-CoV-2 challenge.
Emerg Microbes Infect. 2021 Dec; 10(1):1555-1573.EM

Abstract

To curb the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), multiple platforms have been employed toward a safe and highly effective vaccine. Here, we develop a novel cell-based vaccine candidate, namely K562-S, by utilizing human cell K562 as a cellular carrier to display Spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2 on the membrane. Analogous to the traditional inactivated vaccine, K562-S cells can be propagated to a large scale by culturing and completely lose their viability after exposure to X-ray irradiation or formalin. We in turn demonstrated high immunogenicity of formalin-inactivated K562-S vaccine in both mouse and non-human primates and its protective efficacy in mice. In mice, immunization with inactivated K562-S vaccines can elicit potent neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses persisting longer than 5 months. We consequently showed in a hACE2 mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that a two-shot vaccination with adjuvanted K562-S rendered greater than 3 log reduction in viral lung load and concomitant ameliorated lung pathology. Of importance, the administration of the same regimen in non-human primates was able to induce a neutralizing antibody titer averaging three-fold higher relative to human convalescent serum. These results together support the promise of K562-based, S-protein-expressing vaccines as a novel vaccination approach against SARS-CoV-2. Importantly, with a powerful capacity to carry external genes for cell-based vectors, this platform could rapidly generate two- and multiple-valent vaccines by incorporating SARS-CoV-2 mutants, SARS-CoV, or MERS-CoV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Key Laboratory of Cell Proliferation and Differentiation of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences & Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Key Laboratory of Cell Proliferation and Differentiation of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences & Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center & Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34304724

Citation

He, Xiangchuan, et al. "A Human Cell-based SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Elicits Potent Neutralizing Antibody Responses and Protects Mice From SARS-CoV-2 Challenge." Emerging Microbes & Infections, vol. 10, no. 1, 2021, pp. 1555-1573.
He X, Ding L, Cao K, et al. A human cell-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibody responses and protects mice from SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2021;10(1):1555-1573.
He, X., Ding, L., Cao, K., Peng, H., Gu, C., Li, Y., Li, D., Dong, L., Hong, X., Wang, X., Fu, M., Qiu, C., Zhu, C., Zhang, Z., Song, S., Wang, C., Jiang, Z., Xie, Y., Qi, Z., ... Xu, J. (2021). A human cell-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibody responses and protects mice from SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 10(1), 1555-1573. https://doi.org/10.1080/22221751.2021.1957400
He X, et al. A Human Cell-based SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Elicits Potent Neutralizing Antibody Responses and Protects Mice From SARS-CoV-2 Challenge. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2021;10(1):1555-1573. PubMed PMID: 34304724.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A human cell-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibody responses and protects mice from SARS-CoV-2 challenge. AU - He,Xiangchuan, AU - Ding,Longfei, AU - Cao,Kangli, AU - Peng,Haoran, AU - Gu,Chenjian, AU - Li,Yutang, AU - Li,Duoduo, AU - Dong,Lanlan, AU - Hong,Xiujing, AU - Wang,Xiangwei, AU - Fu,Meilan, AU - Qiu,Chenli, AU - Zhu,Cuisong, AU - Zhang,Ziling, AU - Song,Shu, AU - Wang,Chenguang, AU - Jiang,Zhengfan, AU - Xie,Youhua, AU - Qi,Zhongtian, AU - Zhao,Chen, AU - Zhao,Ping, AU - Zhang,Xiaoyan, AU - Xu,Jianqing, PY - 2021/7/27/pubmed PY - 2021/8/20/medline PY - 2021/7/26/entrez KW - K562-S KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - cell-based vaccines KW - mouse model KW - neutralizing antibody KW - non-human primate model KW - protection SP - 1555 EP - 1573 JF - Emerging microbes & infections JO - Emerg Microbes Infect VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - To curb the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), multiple platforms have been employed toward a safe and highly effective vaccine. Here, we develop a novel cell-based vaccine candidate, namely K562-S, by utilizing human cell K562 as a cellular carrier to display Spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2 on the membrane. Analogous to the traditional inactivated vaccine, K562-S cells can be propagated to a large scale by culturing and completely lose their viability after exposure to X-ray irradiation or formalin. We in turn demonstrated high immunogenicity of formalin-inactivated K562-S vaccine in both mouse and non-human primates and its protective efficacy in mice. In mice, immunization with inactivated K562-S vaccines can elicit potent neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses persisting longer than 5 months. We consequently showed in a hACE2 mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that a two-shot vaccination with adjuvanted K562-S rendered greater than 3 log reduction in viral lung load and concomitant ameliorated lung pathology. Of importance, the administration of the same regimen in non-human primates was able to induce a neutralizing antibody titer averaging three-fold higher relative to human convalescent serum. These results together support the promise of K562-based, S-protein-expressing vaccines as a novel vaccination approach against SARS-CoV-2. Importantly, with a powerful capacity to carry external genes for cell-based vectors, this platform could rapidly generate two- and multiple-valent vaccines by incorporating SARS-CoV-2 mutants, SARS-CoV, or MERS-CoV. SN - 2222-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34304724/A_human_cell_based_SARS_CoV_2_vaccine_elicits_potent_neutralizing_antibody_responses_and_protects_mice_from_SARS_CoV_2_challenge_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/22221751.2021.1957400 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -