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Perception of online teacher self-efficacy: A multi-state study of nursing faculty pivoting courses during COVID 19.
Nurse Educ Today. 2021 Nov; 106:105064.NE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

COVID-19 forced many colleges and schools of nursing to abruptly pivot face-to-face learning to online formats. Online teaching is not new, but some faculty have not taught in a virtual environment and rapidly transitioning courses online was challenging. It is not known if teacher self-efficacy was impacted by these circumstances.

OBJECTIVES

We aimed to assess online teacher self-efficacy of nursing faculty who transitioned at least one-face-to face course to an online format. We hypothesized that faculty with previous online teaching experience and greater self-rated instructional support would demonstrate higher online teacher self-efficacy scores compared to faculty who had little or no online teaching experience or reported less satisfaction with instructional support.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used.

SETTING

Faculty from ten universities across the United States were recruited.

PARTICIPANTS

Nursing faculty (N = 84) who transitioned at least one face-to-face course to an online format during COVID-19 were included in the study.

METHODS

Participants completed the 32-item Michigan Nurse Educators Sense of Efficacy for Online Teaching (MNESEOT) instrument and a demographic questionnaire which included items about prior online teaching experience and instructional support.

RESULTS

Participants scored overall teacher self-efficacy high (75th percentile). "Computer skills" were scored highest while "student engagement" scored lowest. Prior online teaching was a predictor of higher online teacher self-efficacy; however, instructional support was not a predictor of higher online teacher self-efficacy.

CONCLUSION

Nursing faculty reported a high level of online teacher self-efficacy during an abrupt pivot from face-to-face teaching to a virtual format. Pre-emptive opportunities to teach online can build self-efficacy for novice faculty. Faculty and students will benefit from improving student engagement skills, especially during isolating and overwhelming events such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina Wilmington, United States of America. Electronic address: culprochea@uncw.edu.University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States of America. Electronic address: fdhard02@louisville.edu.Clinical Nursing at Louisiana State University Health New Orleans School of Nursing, New Orleans, LA, United States of America. Electronic address: ttarta@lsuhsc.edu.University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, KY, United States of America. Electronic address: debra.hampton@uky.edu.University of Kentucky College of Nursing, United States of America. Electronic address: angela.hensley@uky.edu.University of Kentucky College of Nursing, United States of America. Electronic address: jessical.wilson@uky.edu.University of Kentucky College of Nursing, United States of America. Electronic address: atwiggins@uky.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34329961

Citation

Culp-Roche, Amanda, et al. "Perception of Online Teacher Self-efficacy: a Multi-state Study of Nursing Faculty Pivoting Courses During COVID 19." Nurse Education Today, vol. 106, 2021, p. 105064.
Culp-Roche A, Hardin-Fanning F, Tartavoulle T, et al. Perception of online teacher self-efficacy: A multi-state study of nursing faculty pivoting courses during COVID 19. Nurse Educ Today. 2021;106:105064.
Culp-Roche, A., Hardin-Fanning, F., Tartavoulle, T., Hampton, D., Hensley, A., Wilson, J. L., & Wiggins, A. T. (2021). Perception of online teacher self-efficacy: A multi-state study of nursing faculty pivoting courses during COVID 19. Nurse Education Today, 106, 105064. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2021.105064
Culp-Roche A, et al. Perception of Online Teacher Self-efficacy: a Multi-state Study of Nursing Faculty Pivoting Courses During COVID 19. Nurse Educ Today. 2021;106:105064. PubMed PMID: 34329961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perception of online teacher self-efficacy: A multi-state study of nursing faculty pivoting courses during COVID 19. AU - Culp-Roche,Amanda, AU - Hardin-Fanning,Fran, AU - Tartavoulle,Todd, AU - Hampton,Debra, AU - Hensley,Angie, AU - Wilson,Jessica L, AU - Wiggins,Amanda Thaxton, Y1 - 2021/07/22/ PY - 2021/02/17/received PY - 2021/06/23/revised PY - 2021/07/15/accepted PY - 2021/7/31/pubmed PY - 2021/9/15/medline PY - 2021/7/30/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Nursing faculty KW - Online teacher self-efficacy SP - 105064 EP - 105064 JF - Nurse education today JO - Nurse Educ Today VL - 106 N2 - BACKGROUND: COVID-19 forced many colleges and schools of nursing to abruptly pivot face-to-face learning to online formats. Online teaching is not new, but some faculty have not taught in a virtual environment and rapidly transitioning courses online was challenging. It is not known if teacher self-efficacy was impacted by these circumstances. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess online teacher self-efficacy of nursing faculty who transitioned at least one-face-to face course to an online format. We hypothesized that faculty with previous online teaching experience and greater self-rated instructional support would demonstrate higher online teacher self-efficacy scores compared to faculty who had little or no online teaching experience or reported less satisfaction with instructional support. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. SETTING: Faculty from ten universities across the United States were recruited. PARTICIPANTS: Nursing faculty (N = 84) who transitioned at least one face-to-face course to an online format during COVID-19 were included in the study. METHODS: Participants completed the 32-item Michigan Nurse Educators Sense of Efficacy for Online Teaching (MNESEOT) instrument and a demographic questionnaire which included items about prior online teaching experience and instructional support. RESULTS: Participants scored overall teacher self-efficacy high (75th percentile). "Computer skills" were scored highest while "student engagement" scored lowest. Prior online teaching was a predictor of higher online teacher self-efficacy; however, instructional support was not a predictor of higher online teacher self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: Nursing faculty reported a high level of online teacher self-efficacy during an abrupt pivot from face-to-face teaching to a virtual format. Pre-emptive opportunities to teach online can build self-efficacy for novice faculty. Faculty and students will benefit from improving student engagement skills, especially during isolating and overwhelming events such as the COVID-19 pandemic. SN - 1532-2793 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34329961/Perception_of_online_teacher_self_efficacy:_A_multi_state_study_of_nursing_faculty_pivoting_courses_during_COVID_19_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0260-6917(21)00321-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -