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Epidemiological and co-infection characteristics of common human coronaviruses in Shanghai, 2015-2020: a retrospective observational study.
Emerg Microbes Infect. 2021 Dec; 10(1):1660-1668.EM

Abstract

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is a major challenge worldwide. However, the epidemic potential of common human coronaviruses (HCoVs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the epidemiological and co-infection characteristics of common HCoVs in individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). This retrospective, observational, multicentre study used data collected from patients admitted to nine sentinel hospitals with ILI and SARI from January 2015 through December 2020 in Shanghai, China. We prospectively tested patients for a total of 22 respiratory pathogens using multi-real-time polymerase chain reaction. Of the 4541 patients tested, 40.37% (1833/4541) tested positive for respiratory pathogens and 3.59% (163/4541) tested positive for common HCoVs. HCoV infection was more common in the non-endemic season for respiratory pathogens (odds ratio: 2.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.64-3.31). HCoV-OC43 (41.72%, 68/163) was the most common type of HCoV detected. The co-infection rate was 31.29% (51/163) among 163 HCoV-positive cases, with HCoV-229E (53.13%, 17/32), the HCoV type that was most frequently associated with co-infection. Respiratory pathogens responsible for co-infections with HCoVs included parainfluenza virus, rhinovirus/enterovirus, influenza A virus, and adenovirus. Furthermore, we identified one patient co-infected with HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63/HKU1. The prevalence of common HCoVs remains low in ILI/SARI cases, in Shanghai. However, the seasonal pattern of HCoVs may be opposite to that of other respiratory pathogens. Moreover, HCoVs are likely to co-exist with specific respiratory pathogens. The potential role of co-infections with HCoVs and other pathogenic microorganisms in infection and pathogenesis of ILI and SARI warrants further study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Acute Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Acute Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Department of Epidemiology, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan School of Public Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan School of Public Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Logistics Support, Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Institute of Pathogen Examination, Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Institute of Pathogen Examination, Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Acute Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan School of Public Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Institute of Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Shanghai Municipal Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34350810

Citation

Kong, Dechuan, et al. "Epidemiological and Co-infection Characteristics of Common Human Coronaviruses in Shanghai, 2015-2020: a Retrospective Observational Study." Emerging Microbes & Infections, vol. 10, no. 1, 2021, pp. 1660-1668.
Kong D, Zheng Y, Hu L, et al. Epidemiological and co-infection characteristics of common human coronaviruses in Shanghai, 2015-2020: a retrospective observational study. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2021;10(1):1660-1668.
Kong, D., Zheng, Y., Hu, L., Chen, J., Wu, H., Teng, Z., Zhou, Y., Qiu, Q., Lu, Y., & Pan, H. (2021). Epidemiological and co-infection characteristics of common human coronaviruses in Shanghai, 2015-2020: a retrospective observational study. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 10(1), 1660-1668. https://doi.org/10.1080/22221751.2021.1965498
Kong D, et al. Epidemiological and Co-infection Characteristics of Common Human Coronaviruses in Shanghai, 2015-2020: a Retrospective Observational Study. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2021;10(1):1660-1668. PubMed PMID: 34350810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiological and co-infection characteristics of common human coronaviruses in Shanghai, 2015-2020: a retrospective observational study. AU - Kong,Dechuan, AU - Zheng,Yaxu, AU - Hu,Linjie, AU - Chen,Jian, AU - Wu,Huanyu, AU - Teng,Zheng, AU - Zhou,Yanqiu, AU - Qiu,Qi, AU - Lu,Yihan, AU - Pan,Hao, PY - 2021/8/6/pubmed PY - 2021/8/31/medline PY - 2021/8/5/entrez KW - HCoV-229E KW - HCoV-OC43 KW - Human coronavirus KW - SARS-COV-2 KW - co-infection KW - respiratory pathogen SP - 1660 EP - 1668 JF - Emerging microbes & infections JO - Emerg Microbes Infect VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is a major challenge worldwide. However, the epidemic potential of common human coronaviruses (HCoVs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the epidemiological and co-infection characteristics of common HCoVs in individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI). This retrospective, observational, multicentre study used data collected from patients admitted to nine sentinel hospitals with ILI and SARI from January 2015 through December 2020 in Shanghai, China. We prospectively tested patients for a total of 22 respiratory pathogens using multi-real-time polymerase chain reaction. Of the 4541 patients tested, 40.37% (1833/4541) tested positive for respiratory pathogens and 3.59% (163/4541) tested positive for common HCoVs. HCoV infection was more common in the non-endemic season for respiratory pathogens (odds ratio: 2.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.64-3.31). HCoV-OC43 (41.72%, 68/163) was the most common type of HCoV detected. The co-infection rate was 31.29% (51/163) among 163 HCoV-positive cases, with HCoV-229E (53.13%, 17/32), the HCoV type that was most frequently associated with co-infection. Respiratory pathogens responsible for co-infections with HCoVs included parainfluenza virus, rhinovirus/enterovirus, influenza A virus, and adenovirus. Furthermore, we identified one patient co-infected with HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63/HKU1. The prevalence of common HCoVs remains low in ILI/SARI cases, in Shanghai. However, the seasonal pattern of HCoVs may be opposite to that of other respiratory pathogens. Moreover, HCoVs are likely to co-exist with specific respiratory pathogens. The potential role of co-infections with HCoVs and other pathogenic microorganisms in infection and pathogenesis of ILI and SARI warrants further study. SN - 2222-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34350810/Epidemiological_and_co_infection_characteristics_of_common_human_coronaviruses_in_Shanghai_2015_2020:_a_retrospective_observational_study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/22221751.2021.1965498 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -