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Perceived anxiety and physical activity behaviour changes during the early stages of COVID-19 restrictions in community-dwelling adults in Canada: a cross-sectional study.
BMJ Open. 2021 08 05; 11(8):e050550.BO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The COVID-19 pandemic changed daily routines, including physical activity, which could influence physical and mental health. In our study, we describe physical activity and sedentary behaviour patterns in relation to the pandemic and estimate associations between anxiety and physical activity and sedentary behaviour in community-dwelling adults.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

PARTICIPANTS

Between April and June 2020, a random sample of 1124 adults (≥18 years) completed an online questionnaire.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES

The online questionnaire captured current walking, moderate intensity, vigorous intensity and total physical activity and sedentary behaviour (ie, sitting and leisure-based screen time), perceived relative changes in physical activity, sedentary and social behaviours since the pandemic, perceived seriousness and anxiety related to COVID-19, and sociodemographic characteristics. Differences in sociodemographic characteristics, perceived relative change in behaviour and current physical activity and sedentary behaviour were compared between adults with low and high anxiety.

RESULTS

Our sample (n=1047) included more females (60.3%) and fewer older adults (19.2%). Most participants (88.4%) considered COVID-19 as extremely or very serious and one-third (32.9%) felt extremely or very anxious. We found no differences (p>0.05) in current physical activity or sedentary behaviour by anxiety level. The largest perceived change in behaviours included social distancing, driving motor vehicles, use of screen-based devices, watching television and interactions with neighbours. We found anxiety-related differences (p<0.05) in perceived changes in various behaviours.

CONCLUSIONS

Changes in physical activity, sedentary behaviour and social behaviour occurred soon after the COVID-19 pandemic was declared, and some of these changes differed among those with low and high anxiety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada gmccorma@ucalgary.ca. Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. School of Planning, Architecture and Landscape, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. School of Planning, Architecture and Landscape, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, Saint Catharines, Ontario, Canada.Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34353807

Citation

McCormack, Gavin R., et al. "Perceived Anxiety and Physical Activity Behaviour Changes During the Early Stages of COVID-19 Restrictions in Community-dwelling Adults in Canada: a Cross-sectional Study." BMJ Open, vol. 11, no. 8, 2021, pp. e050550.
McCormack GR, Doyle-Baker PK, Petersen JA, et al. Perceived anxiety and physical activity behaviour changes during the early stages of COVID-19 restrictions in community-dwelling adults in Canada: a cross-sectional study. BMJ Open. 2021;11(8):e050550.
McCormack, G. R., Doyle-Baker, P. K., Petersen, J. A., & Ghoneim, D. (2021). Perceived anxiety and physical activity behaviour changes during the early stages of COVID-19 restrictions in community-dwelling adults in Canada: a cross-sectional study. BMJ Open, 11(8), e050550. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2021-050550
McCormack GR, et al. Perceived Anxiety and Physical Activity Behaviour Changes During the Early Stages of COVID-19 Restrictions in Community-dwelling Adults in Canada: a Cross-sectional Study. BMJ Open. 2021 08 5;11(8):e050550. PubMed PMID: 34353807.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perceived anxiety and physical activity behaviour changes during the early stages of COVID-19 restrictions in community-dwelling adults in Canada: a cross-sectional study. AU - McCormack,Gavin R, AU - Doyle-Baker,Patricia K, AU - Petersen,Jennie A, AU - Ghoneim,Dalia, Y1 - 2021/08/05/ PY - 2021/8/6/entrez PY - 2021/8/7/pubmed PY - 2021/8/10/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - epidemiology KW - mental health KW - public health SP - e050550 EP - e050550 JF - BMJ open JO - BMJ Open VL - 11 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic changed daily routines, including physical activity, which could influence physical and mental health. In our study, we describe physical activity and sedentary behaviour patterns in relation to the pandemic and estimate associations between anxiety and physical activity and sedentary behaviour in community-dwelling adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Calgary, Alberta, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Between April and June 2020, a random sample of 1124 adults (≥18 years) completed an online questionnaire. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: The online questionnaire captured current walking, moderate intensity, vigorous intensity and total physical activity and sedentary behaviour (ie, sitting and leisure-based screen time), perceived relative changes in physical activity, sedentary and social behaviours since the pandemic, perceived seriousness and anxiety related to COVID-19, and sociodemographic characteristics. Differences in sociodemographic characteristics, perceived relative change in behaviour and current physical activity and sedentary behaviour were compared between adults with low and high anxiety. RESULTS: Our sample (n=1047) included more females (60.3%) and fewer older adults (19.2%). Most participants (88.4%) considered COVID-19 as extremely or very serious and one-third (32.9%) felt extremely or very anxious. We found no differences (p>0.05) in current physical activity or sedentary behaviour by anxiety level. The largest perceived change in behaviours included social distancing, driving motor vehicles, use of screen-based devices, watching television and interactions with neighbours. We found anxiety-related differences (p<0.05) in perceived changes in various behaviours. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in physical activity, sedentary behaviour and social behaviour occurred soon after the COVID-19 pandemic was declared, and some of these changes differed among those with low and high anxiety. SN - 2044-6055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34353807/Perceived_anxiety_and_physical_activity_behaviour_changes_during_the_early_stages_of_COVID_19_restrictions_in_community_dwelling_adults_in_Canada:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=34353807 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -