Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Maternal and infant outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: a retrospective study in Guangzhou, China.
Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2021 Aug 17; 19(1):126.RB

Abstract

In late December 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic caused a great threat to people's lives worldwide. As a special category of the population, pregnant women are vulnerable during emergencies. This study was designed to explore whether or not the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced maternal and infant outcomes. We collected maternal characteristics, laboratory results, condition in the third trimester, maternal outcome, fetal or neonatal outcomes, and characteristics of amniotic fluid, umbilical cord and placenta from pregnant women and fetals or newborns in the first affiliated hospital of Jinan university from 24 January to 31 March 2020 (peak period), chose the same types of data at the hospital during the same period in 2019 and 1 January-23 January 2020 (prior to the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020) as a control. Our study focused on uncomplicated singleton pregnancies among women not infected by COVID-19. The results demonstrated that there was not an increase in adverse outcomes of pregnant women and newborns during the COVID-19 pandemic; This might be associated with the updated design of major epidemic prevention and control systems in Guangzhou, and the extension of pregnant women's rest time during the third trimester of pregnancy. Nevertheless, the survey showed an increased incidence rate of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and zinc deficiency in newborns during the epidemic, implying that pregnant women should participate in appropriate physical exercise, increase their exposure to outdoor sunlight and improve nutrition intake to ensure healthy newborns during the quarantine period. Our study has provided some guidance for maternal management during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The First Affiliate Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510630, China. International Joint Laboratory for Embryonic Development & Prenatal Medicine, Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China.The First Affiliate Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510630, China.International Joint Laboratory for Embryonic Development & Prenatal Medicine, Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China.The First Affiliate Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510630, China.International Joint Laboratory for Embryonic Development & Prenatal Medicine, Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China. Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China.International Joint Laboratory for Embryonic Development & Prenatal Medicine, Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China. yang_xuesong@126.com. Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China. yang_xuesong@126.com. Guangdong-Hong Kong Metabolism & Reproduction Joint Laboratory, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China. yang_xuesong@126.com.The First Affiliate Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510630, China. ruiman_li@163.com.International Joint Laboratory for Embryonic Development & Prenatal Medicine, Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China. t_wangguang@jnu.edu.cn. Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China. t_wangguang@jnu.edu.cn. Guangdong-Hong Kong Metabolism & Reproduction Joint Laboratory, Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China. t_wangguang@jnu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34404413

Citation

Wang, Jingyun, et al. "Maternal and Infant Outcomes During the COVID-19 Pandemic: a Retrospective Study in Guangzhou, China." Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology : RB&E, vol. 19, no. 1, 2021, p. 126.
Wang J, Wang Y, He MY, et al. Maternal and infant outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: a retrospective study in Guangzhou, China. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2021;19(1):126.
Wang, J., Wang, Y., He, M. Y., Li, Y. X., Cheng, X., Yang, X., Li, R. M., & Wang, G. (2021). Maternal and infant outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: a retrospective study in Guangzhou, China. Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology : RB&E, 19(1), 126. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12958-021-00807-z
Wang J, et al. Maternal and Infant Outcomes During the COVID-19 Pandemic: a Retrospective Study in Guangzhou, China. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2021 Aug 17;19(1):126. PubMed PMID: 34404413.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal and infant outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: a retrospective study in Guangzhou, China. AU - Wang,Jingyun, AU - Wang,Yun, AU - He,Mei-Yao, AU - Li,Yi-Xiao, AU - Cheng,Xin, AU - Yang,Xuesong, AU - Li,Rui-Man, AU - Wang,Guang, Y1 - 2021/08/17/ PY - 2021/01/26/received PY - 2021/07/26/accepted PY - 2021/8/18/entrez PY - 2021/8/19/pubmed PY - 2021/8/25/medline SP - 126 EP - 126 JF - Reproductive biology and endocrinology : RB&E JO - Reprod Biol Endocrinol VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - In late December 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic caused a great threat to people's lives worldwide. As a special category of the population, pregnant women are vulnerable during emergencies. This study was designed to explore whether or not the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced maternal and infant outcomes. We collected maternal characteristics, laboratory results, condition in the third trimester, maternal outcome, fetal or neonatal outcomes, and characteristics of amniotic fluid, umbilical cord and placenta from pregnant women and fetals or newborns in the first affiliated hospital of Jinan university from 24 January to 31 March 2020 (peak period), chose the same types of data at the hospital during the same period in 2019 and 1 January-23 January 2020 (prior to the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020) as a control. Our study focused on uncomplicated singleton pregnancies among women not infected by COVID-19. The results demonstrated that there was not an increase in adverse outcomes of pregnant women and newborns during the COVID-19 pandemic; This might be associated with the updated design of major epidemic prevention and control systems in Guangzhou, and the extension of pregnant women's rest time during the third trimester of pregnancy. Nevertheless, the survey showed an increased incidence rate of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and zinc deficiency in newborns during the epidemic, implying that pregnant women should participate in appropriate physical exercise, increase their exposure to outdoor sunlight and improve nutrition intake to ensure healthy newborns during the quarantine period. Our study has provided some guidance for maternal management during the COVID-19 pandemic. SN - 1477-7827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34404413/Maternal_and_infant_outcomes_during_the_COVID_19_pandemic:_a_retrospective_study_in_Guangzhou_China_ L2 - https://rbej.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12958-021-00807-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -