Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Herd immunity: challenges and the way forward in Korea.
Epidemiol Health. 2021; 43:e2021054.EH

Abstract

Vaccination is considered to be the most effective measure for preventing the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Many countries, including of Korea, are focusing on achieving herd immunity with the goal of reaching a vaccination rate of 70-80%. However, achieving herd immunity does not mean eradicating COVID-19, and the following challenges can occur in the process of achieving herd immunity. First, as the vaccination rate is likely to slow down over time, it is necessary to promote the benefits of vaccination through risk communication strategies and provide incentives for those who have been vaccinated. Second, a booster dose may be required depending on future studies on vaccine-induced immunity. Third, since variants capable of evading immunity and with higher transmissibility can emerge, rapid contract tracing and regular community genomic surveillance could help mitigate the impact of new variants. When the impact of COVID-19 is controlled to the level of seasonal influenza, the current public health measures that have been strictly imposed on society since the beginning of the pandemic will no longer be needed. The overall response strategy to COVID-19 will need to change accordingly, based on evaluations of the level of population immunity. These changes will include more efficient and targeted contact tracing and eased quarantine measures for vaccinated close contacts and travelers. Mask wearing and a minimum of social distancing will still be required in the journey towards the end of the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic will end, but the virus will not disappear.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Risk Assessment, Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency, Cheongju, Korea.Division of Risk Assessment, Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency, Cheongju, Korea.Division of Risk Assessment, Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency, Cheongju, Korea.Division of Risk Assessment, Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency, Cheongju, Korea.Division of Risk Assessment, Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency, Cheongju, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34412446

Citation

Oh, Jiyoung, et al. "Herd Immunity: Challenges and the Way Forward in Korea." Epidemiology and Health, vol. 43, 2021, pp. e2021054.
Oh J, Kim S, Ryu B, et al. Herd immunity: challenges and the way forward in Korea. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021054.
Oh, J., Kim, S., Ryu, B., Shin, M., & Kim, B. I. (2021). Herd immunity: challenges and the way forward in Korea. Epidemiology and Health, 43, e2021054. https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021054
Oh J, et al. Herd Immunity: Challenges and the Way Forward in Korea. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021054. PubMed PMID: 34412446.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Herd immunity: challenges and the way forward in Korea. AU - Oh,Jiyoung, AU - Kim,Sohyun, AU - Ryu,Boyeong, AU - Shin,Minjoung, AU - Kim,Bryan Inho, Y1 - 2021/08/18/ PY - 2021/07/23/received PY - 2021/08/18/accepted PY - 2021/8/21/pubmed PY - 2021/10/8/medline PY - 2021/8/20/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Herd immunity KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - Transmission SP - e2021054 EP - e2021054 JF - Epidemiology and health JO - Epidemiol Health VL - 43 N2 - Vaccination is considered to be the most effective measure for preventing the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Many countries, including of Korea, are focusing on achieving herd immunity with the goal of reaching a vaccination rate of 70-80%. However, achieving herd immunity does not mean eradicating COVID-19, and the following challenges can occur in the process of achieving herd immunity. First, as the vaccination rate is likely to slow down over time, it is necessary to promote the benefits of vaccination through risk communication strategies and provide incentives for those who have been vaccinated. Second, a booster dose may be required depending on future studies on vaccine-induced immunity. Third, since variants capable of evading immunity and with higher transmissibility can emerge, rapid contract tracing and regular community genomic surveillance could help mitigate the impact of new variants. When the impact of COVID-19 is controlled to the level of seasonal influenza, the current public health measures that have been strictly imposed on society since the beginning of the pandemic will no longer be needed. The overall response strategy to COVID-19 will need to change accordingly, based on evaluations of the level of population immunity. These changes will include more efficient and targeted contact tracing and eased quarantine measures for vaccinated close contacts and travelers. Mask wearing and a minimum of social distancing will still be required in the journey towards the end of the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic will end, but the virus will not disappear. SN - 2092-7193 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34412446/Herd_immunity:_challenges_and_the_way_forward_in_Korea_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021054 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -