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Public trust and the COVID-19 vaccination campaign: lessons from the Philippines as it emerges from the Dengvaxia controversy.
Int J Health Plann Manage. 2021 Nov; 36(6):2048-2055.IJ

Abstract

While the entire world prepares and begins to roll out COVID-19 vaccines, the Philippines is still reeling from the consequences of the Dengvaxia controversy in 2016. Those highly political events led to the erosion of public trust in leaders and a significant damage to vaccine confidence in the country, now potentially impacting the uptake of COVID-19 vaccines. We discuss how public trust and confidence can be rehabilitated through accountability, transparency, and proper communication from the most trusted sources of the population. We also highlight key lessons for policymakers and leaders on allowing science to take the front seat, and politics behind, for the safety and well-being of the people during this public health crisis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Government, Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.School of Medicine and Public Health, Ateneo de Manila University, Pasig City, Philippines.School of Medicine and Public Health, Ateneo de Manila University, Pasig City, Philippines.School of Medicine and Public Health, Ateneo de Manila University, Pasig City, Philippines.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34414601

Citation

Mendoza, Ronald U., et al. "Public Trust and the COVID-19 Vaccination Campaign: Lessons From the Philippines as It Emerges From the Dengvaxia Controversy." The International Journal of Health Planning and Management, vol. 36, no. 6, 2021, pp. 2048-2055.
Mendoza RU, Dayrit MM, Alfonso CR, et al. Public trust and the COVID-19 vaccination campaign: lessons from the Philippines as it emerges from the Dengvaxia controversy. Int J Health Plann Manage. 2021;36(6):2048-2055.
Mendoza, R. U., Dayrit, M. M., Alfonso, C. R., & Ong, M. M. A. (2021). Public trust and the COVID-19 vaccination campaign: lessons from the Philippines as it emerges from the Dengvaxia controversy. The International Journal of Health Planning and Management, 36(6), 2048-2055. https://doi.org/10.1002/hpm.3297
Mendoza RU, et al. Public Trust and the COVID-19 Vaccination Campaign: Lessons From the Philippines as It Emerges From the Dengvaxia Controversy. Int J Health Plann Manage. 2021;36(6):2048-2055. PubMed PMID: 34414601.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Public trust and the COVID-19 vaccination campaign: lessons from the Philippines as it emerges from the Dengvaxia controversy. AU - Mendoza,Ronald U, AU - Dayrit,Manuel M, AU - Alfonso,Cenon R, AU - Ong,Madeline Mae A, Y1 - 2021/08/19/ PY - 2021/06/24/revised PY - 2021/01/23/received PY - 2021/07/28/accepted PY - 2021/8/21/pubmed PY - 2021/11/18/medline PY - 2021/8/20/entrez KW - COVID-19 vaccines KW - Dengvaxia KW - Philippines KW - trust KW - vaccine hesitancy SP - 2048 EP - 2055 JF - The International journal of health planning and management JO - Int J Health Plann Manage VL - 36 IS - 6 N2 - While the entire world prepares and begins to roll out COVID-19 vaccines, the Philippines is still reeling from the consequences of the Dengvaxia controversy in 2016. Those highly political events led to the erosion of public trust in leaders and a significant damage to vaccine confidence in the country, now potentially impacting the uptake of COVID-19 vaccines. We discuss how public trust and confidence can be rehabilitated through accountability, transparency, and proper communication from the most trusted sources of the population. We also highlight key lessons for policymakers and leaders on allowing science to take the front seat, and politics behind, for the safety and well-being of the people during this public health crisis. SN - 1099-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34414601/Public_trust_and_the_COVID_19_vaccination_campaign:_lessons_from_the_Philippines_as_it_emerges_from_the_Dengvaxia_controversy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hpm.3297 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -