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Effects of Exergame-Based Dual-Task Training on Executive Function and Dual-Task Performance in Community-Dwelling Older People: A Randomized-Controlled Trial.
Games Health J. 2021 Oct; 10(5):347-354.GH

Abstract

Objective: Aging is associated with decline in executive function that may lead to reduced dual-task performance. Regular exercise has been recommended for promoting or maintaining mental and physical health in older adults, yet only a fraction of older adults exercise regularly. Exergame training may have the potential to enhance exercise adherence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of exergame-based dual-task training on executive function and dual-task performance in community-dwelling older adults. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blinded, randomized-controlled trial. Twenty community-dwelling older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to one of two groups. All participants completed 36 trainings, including three 60-minute sessions/week over 12 weeks. Participants in the experimental group received exergame-based dual-task training, while those in the control group received home-based multicomponent exercise training. Measures of executive function, dual-task performance, and community walking ability were assessed before and after the intervention. Results: Significant group × time interactions (P = 0.000-0.027) with large effects were found in all selected outcome measures. Compared with the control group, the experimental group improved significantly in measures of general executive function (P = 0.014), inhibitory control (P = 0.037), cognitive dual-task performance (P < 0.001), and community walking ability (P = 0.002). Enhanced general executive function was highly correlated with either improved motor dual-task performance (r = 0.674) or improved cognitive dual-task performance (r = -0.701). Conclusion: These results suggested that exergame-based dual-task training improved both executive function and dual-task performance in older people. These positive effects could be transferred to enhance community walking ability. Clinical Trial Registration number: ACTRN 12617000095369.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City, Taiwan.Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Neurology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Preventive Medicine Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34491113

Citation

Wang, Ray-Yau, et al. "Effects of Exergame-Based Dual-Task Training On Executive Function and Dual-Task Performance in Community-Dwelling Older People: a Randomized-Controlled Trial." Games for Health Journal, vol. 10, no. 5, 2021, pp. 347-354.
Wang RY, Huang YC, Zhou JH, et al. Effects of Exergame-Based Dual-Task Training on Executive Function and Dual-Task Performance in Community-Dwelling Older People: A Randomized-Controlled Trial. Games Health J. 2021;10(5):347-354.
Wang, R. Y., Huang, Y. C., Zhou, J. H., Cheng, S. J., & Yang, Y. R. (2021). Effects of Exergame-Based Dual-Task Training on Executive Function and Dual-Task Performance in Community-Dwelling Older People: A Randomized-Controlled Trial. Games for Health Journal, 10(5), 347-354. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2021.0057
Wang RY, et al. Effects of Exergame-Based Dual-Task Training On Executive Function and Dual-Task Performance in Community-Dwelling Older People: a Randomized-Controlled Trial. Games Health J. 2021;10(5):347-354. PubMed PMID: 34491113.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of Exergame-Based Dual-Task Training on Executive Function and Dual-Task Performance in Community-Dwelling Older People: A Randomized-Controlled Trial. AU - Wang,Ray-Yau, AU - Huang,Yuan-Chen, AU - Zhou,Jun-Hong, AU - Cheng,Shih-Jung, AU - Yang,Yea-Ru, Y1 - 2021/09/01/ PY - 2021/9/8/pubmed PY - 2021/10/26/medline PY - 2021/9/7/entrez KW - aging KW - cognitive function KW - community mobility KW - dual task KW - exercise intervention KW - exergame SP - 347 EP - 354 JF - Games for health journal JO - Games Health J VL - 10 IS - 5 N2 - Objective: Aging is associated with decline in executive function that may lead to reduced dual-task performance. Regular exercise has been recommended for promoting or maintaining mental and physical health in older adults, yet only a fraction of older adults exercise regularly. Exergame training may have the potential to enhance exercise adherence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of exergame-based dual-task training on executive function and dual-task performance in community-dwelling older adults. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blinded, randomized-controlled trial. Twenty community-dwelling older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to one of two groups. All participants completed 36 trainings, including three 60-minute sessions/week over 12 weeks. Participants in the experimental group received exergame-based dual-task training, while those in the control group received home-based multicomponent exercise training. Measures of executive function, dual-task performance, and community walking ability were assessed before and after the intervention. Results: Significant group × time interactions (P = 0.000-0.027) with large effects were found in all selected outcome measures. Compared with the control group, the experimental group improved significantly in measures of general executive function (P = 0.014), inhibitory control (P = 0.037), cognitive dual-task performance (P < 0.001), and community walking ability (P = 0.002). Enhanced general executive function was highly correlated with either improved motor dual-task performance (r = 0.674) or improved cognitive dual-task performance (r = -0.701). Conclusion: These results suggested that exergame-based dual-task training improved both executive function and dual-task performance in older people. These positive effects could be transferred to enhance community walking ability. Clinical Trial Registration number: ACTRN 12617000095369. SN - 2161-7856 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34491113/Effects_of_Exergame_Based_Dual_Task_Training_on_Executive_Function_and_Dual_Task_Performance_in_Community_Dwelling_Older_People:_A_Randomized_Controlled_Trial_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/g4h.2021.0057?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -