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Online education at the medical School of Tongji University during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study.
BMC Med Educ. 2021 Sep 28; 21(1):512.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The global reputation of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has led universities in China to conduct online teaching. However, the actual feedback from medical teachers and students regarding online education remains unclear.

METHODS

A prospective questionnaire survey examined the current opinions of online education from teachers and students at the Medical School of Tongji University.

RESULTS

A total of 488 valid questionnaires were collected (223 males, 45.7%; 265 females, 54.3%), including 394 students (80.7%) and 94 teachers (19.3%). Most teachers and students were "in favor of online teaching," had "positive views for online education," were "satisfied with online teaching," and "expected for regular online education," although students thought that "too much learning tasks had been assigned" (90.4% teachers vs. 43.1% students, P < 0.001) and "less teaching effect than in offline classes" (68.1% teachers vs. 43.4% students). Compared to female counterpart, male students had higher "learning interest" (27.6% vs. 14.9%), "learning attention" (29.2% vs. 14.4%), "learning efficiency" (30.2% vs. 16.7%), and "better learning effect" (27.6% vs. 15.3%). Furthermore, male students had a significantly rise in attendance rate. Compared with male teachers, female teachers had less "experience in online educational course recording" (25.9% vs. 50%) and "past training for online teaching" (53.7% vs. 77.5%). Furthermore, they tended to be more "resistant to online teaching" (44.4% vs. 22.5%) and less "ready for online teaching" (70.4% vs. 87.5%). There was no significant difference in the acceptance of online teaching among teachers in different age groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Most teachers and students supported and were satisfied with the implementation of online education during the pandemic. Although teachers were less adaptable to online education, they still had positive opinions. Sex influenced the acceptance of online teaching. Male teachers and students showed better adaptability than their female counterparts. Although online teaching has advantages, it still cannot completely replace traditional offline teaching. As online education is a trend for future learning, universities should make more efforts to improve it, especially to provide more attention to female teachers and students.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Nephrology and Clinical Metabolomics and Division of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People's Republic of China.Center for Nephrology and Clinical Metabolomics and Division of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People's Republic of China.Center for Nephrology and Clinical Metabolomics and Division of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People's Republic of China.Center for Nephrology and Clinical Metabolomics and Division of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People's Republic of China. liuxinying@tongji.edu.cn.Center for Nephrology and Clinical Metabolomics and Division of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200072, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34583700

Citation

Song, Yaxiang, et al. "Online Education at the Medical School of Tongji University During the COVID-19 Pandemic: a Cross-sectional Study." BMC Medical Education, vol. 21, no. 1, 2021, p. 512.
Song Y, Wang S, Liu Y, et al. Online education at the medical School of Tongji University during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study. BMC Med Educ. 2021;21(1):512.
Song, Y., Wang, S., Liu, Y., Liu, X., & Peng, A. (2021). Online education at the medical School of Tongji University during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study. BMC Medical Education, 21(1), 512. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-021-02951-x
Song Y, et al. Online Education at the Medical School of Tongji University During the COVID-19 Pandemic: a Cross-sectional Study. BMC Med Educ. 2021 Sep 28;21(1):512. PubMed PMID: 34583700.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Online education at the medical School of Tongji University during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study. AU - Song,Yaxiang, AU - Wang,Shu, AU - Liu,Yixian, AU - Liu,Xinying, AU - Peng,Ai, Y1 - 2021/09/28/ PY - 2021/05/06/received PY - 2021/09/15/accepted PY - 2021/9/29/entrez PY - 2021/9/30/pubmed PY - 2021/10/1/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - Medical students and teachers KW - Online teaching KW - Prospective study KW - Questionnaire SP - 512 EP - 512 JF - BMC medical education JO - BMC Med Educ VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The global reputation of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has led universities in China to conduct online teaching. However, the actual feedback from medical teachers and students regarding online education remains unclear. METHODS: A prospective questionnaire survey examined the current opinions of online education from teachers and students at the Medical School of Tongji University. RESULTS: A total of 488 valid questionnaires were collected (223 males, 45.7%; 265 females, 54.3%), including 394 students (80.7%) and 94 teachers (19.3%). Most teachers and students were "in favor of online teaching," had "positive views for online education," were "satisfied with online teaching," and "expected for regular online education," although students thought that "too much learning tasks had been assigned" (90.4% teachers vs. 43.1% students, P < 0.001) and "less teaching effect than in offline classes" (68.1% teachers vs. 43.4% students). Compared to female counterpart, male students had higher "learning interest" (27.6% vs. 14.9%), "learning attention" (29.2% vs. 14.4%), "learning efficiency" (30.2% vs. 16.7%), and "better learning effect" (27.6% vs. 15.3%). Furthermore, male students had a significantly rise in attendance rate. Compared with male teachers, female teachers had less "experience in online educational course recording" (25.9% vs. 50%) and "past training for online teaching" (53.7% vs. 77.5%). Furthermore, they tended to be more "resistant to online teaching" (44.4% vs. 22.5%) and less "ready for online teaching" (70.4% vs. 87.5%). There was no significant difference in the acceptance of online teaching among teachers in different age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Most teachers and students supported and were satisfied with the implementation of online education during the pandemic. Although teachers were less adaptable to online education, they still had positive opinions. Sex influenced the acceptance of online teaching. Male teachers and students showed better adaptability than their female counterparts. Although online teaching has advantages, it still cannot completely replace traditional offline teaching. As online education is a trend for future learning, universities should make more efforts to improve it, especially to provide more attention to female teachers and students. SN - 1472-6920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34583700/Online_education_at_the_medical_School_of_Tongji_University_during_the_COVID_19_pandemic:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909-021-02951-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -