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COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy among health care workers, communication, and policy-making.
Am J Infect Control. 2022 01; 50(1):20-25.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine hesitancy in health care workers (HCWs) contributes to personal and patient risk in contracting COVID-19. Reasons behind hesitancy and how best to improve vaccination rates in HCWs are not clear.

METHODS

We adapted a survey using the Health Belief Model framework to evaluate HCW vaccine hesitancy and reasons for choosing for or against COVID-19 vaccination. The survey was sent to 3 large academic medical centers in the Chicagoland area between March and May 2021.

RESULTS

We received 1974 completed responses with 85% of HCWs receiving or anticipating receiving COVID-19 vaccination. Multivariable logistic regression found HCWs were less likely to receive COVID-19 vaccination if they were Black (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.80), Republican (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.31-0.91), or allergic to any vaccine component (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.70) and more likely to receive if they believed people close to them thought it was important for them to receive the vaccine (OR 5.2, 95% CI 3-8).

CONCLUSIONS

A sizable number of HCWs remain vaccine hesitant 1 year into the COVID-19 pandemic. As HCWs are positively influenced by colleagues who believe in COVID-19 vaccination, development of improved communication across HCW departments and roles may improve vaccination rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.Department of Biomedical and Health Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.Advocate Children's Hospital's Heart Institute, Oak Lawn, IL.Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: Gina_Piscitello@rush.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34653527

Citation

Toth-Manikowski, Stephanie M., et al. "COVID-19 Vaccination Hesitancy Among Health Care Workers, Communication, and Policy-making." American Journal of Infection Control, vol. 50, no. 1, 2022, pp. 20-25.
Toth-Manikowski SM, Swirsky ES, Gandhi R, et al. COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy among health care workers, communication, and policy-making. Am J Infect Control. 2022;50(1):20-25.
Toth-Manikowski, S. M., Swirsky, E. S., Gandhi, R., & Piscitello, G. (2022). COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy among health care workers, communication, and policy-making. American Journal of Infection Control, 50(1), 20-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2021.10.004
Toth-Manikowski SM, et al. COVID-19 Vaccination Hesitancy Among Health Care Workers, Communication, and Policy-making. Am J Infect Control. 2022;50(1):20-25. PubMed PMID: 34653527.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy among health care workers, communication, and policy-making. AU - Toth-Manikowski,Stephanie M, AU - Swirsky,Eric S, AU - Gandhi,Rupali, AU - Piscitello,Gina, Y1 - 2021/10/13/ PY - 2021/09/19/received PY - 2021/09/30/revised PY - 2021/10/01/accepted PY - 2021/10/16/pubmed PY - 2021/12/30/medline PY - 2021/10/15/entrez KW - Coronavirus disease 2019 KW - Health Belief Model KW - Vaccine hesitancy SP - 20 EP - 25 JF - American journal of infection control JO - Am J Infect Control VL - 50 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine hesitancy in health care workers (HCWs) contributes to personal and patient risk in contracting COVID-19. Reasons behind hesitancy and how best to improve vaccination rates in HCWs are not clear. METHODS: We adapted a survey using the Health Belief Model framework to evaluate HCW vaccine hesitancy and reasons for choosing for or against COVID-19 vaccination. The survey was sent to 3 large academic medical centers in the Chicagoland area between March and May 2021. RESULTS: We received 1974 completed responses with 85% of HCWs receiving or anticipating receiving COVID-19 vaccination. Multivariable logistic regression found HCWs were less likely to receive COVID-19 vaccination if they were Black (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.80), Republican (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.31-0.91), or allergic to any vaccine component (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.70) and more likely to receive if they believed people close to them thought it was important for them to receive the vaccine (OR 5.2, 95% CI 3-8). CONCLUSIONS: A sizable number of HCWs remain vaccine hesitant 1 year into the COVID-19 pandemic. As HCWs are positively influenced by colleagues who believe in COVID-19 vaccination, development of improved communication across HCW departments and roles may improve vaccination rates. SN - 1527-3296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34653527/COVID_19_vaccination_hesitancy_among_health_care_workers_communication_and_policy_making_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0196-6553(21)00648-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -