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Political Ideologies, Government Trust, and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Survey.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 10 12; 18(20)IJ

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the correlation between political ideologies, government trust, and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in South Korea during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among South Korea's general population and 1000 respondents (aged 18 years and older) were included. We used multivariate logistic regression models to identify the factors associated with vaccine hesitancy. Respondents who self-identified as liberal or held "no political opinion" had higher rates of vaccine hesitancy than conservative respondents. People's trust in the government's countermeasures was associated with vaccination. Respondents who had risk perceptions (affective and cognitive) of COVID-19 had lower rates of vaccine hesitancy. Perceptions that the vaccine was not safe and being aged 18-29, 30-39, or 40-49 were associated with a higher probability of vaccine hesitancy. This study found that even if vaccine safety and risk perceptions toward COVID-19 were adjusted, self-rated political ideologies and government trust was associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. More effort to communicate with those who are *liberal or "no political opinion", younger, and have lower level of trust in the government are required to dissolve vaccine hesitancy. Further studies should analyze the mechanism of COVID-19 vaccine uptake for effective herd immunity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Insurance Research Institute, National Health Insurance Service, Wonju 26464, Korea.Department of Urban Health and Policy, Seoul Health Foundation, Seoul 04512, Korea.Research Analytics & Communications, Gallup Korea, Seoul 03167, Korea.Public Healthcare Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea. Department of Health Policy and Management, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea.Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Centre, Seoul 07061, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34682401

Citation

Park, Hyun Kyung, et al. "Political Ideologies, Government Trust, and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in South Korea: a Cross-Sectional Survey." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 18, no. 20, 2021.
Park HK, Ham JH, Jang DH, et al. Political Ideologies, Government Trust, and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18(20).
Park, H. K., Ham, J. H., Jang, D. H., Lee, J. Y., & Jang, W. M. (2021). Political Ideologies, Government Trust, and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Survey. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(20). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010655
Park HK, et al. Political Ideologies, Government Trust, and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in South Korea: a Cross-Sectional Survey. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 10 12;18(20) PubMed PMID: 34682401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Political Ideologies, Government Trust, and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Survey. AU - Park,Hyun Kyung, AU - Ham,Ji Hye, AU - Jang,Deok Hyun, AU - Lee,Jin Yong, AU - Jang,Won Mo, Y1 - 2021/10/12/ PY - 2021/08/25/received PY - 2021/10/05/revised PY - 2021/10/07/accepted PY - 2021/10/23/entrez PY - 2021/10/24/pubmed PY - 2021/10/29/medline KW - COVID-19 vaccine KW - political ideology KW - trust KW - vaccine hesitancy JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 18 IS - 20 N2 - This study aimed to assess the correlation between political ideologies, government trust, and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in South Korea during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among South Korea's general population and 1000 respondents (aged 18 years and older) were included. We used multivariate logistic regression models to identify the factors associated with vaccine hesitancy. Respondents who self-identified as liberal or held "no political opinion" had higher rates of vaccine hesitancy than conservative respondents. People's trust in the government's countermeasures was associated with vaccination. Respondents who had risk perceptions (affective and cognitive) of COVID-19 had lower rates of vaccine hesitancy. Perceptions that the vaccine was not safe and being aged 18-29, 30-39, or 40-49 were associated with a higher probability of vaccine hesitancy. This study found that even if vaccine safety and risk perceptions toward COVID-19 were adjusted, self-rated political ideologies and government trust was associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. More effort to communicate with those who are *liberal or "no political opinion", younger, and have lower level of trust in the government are required to dissolve vaccine hesitancy. Further studies should analyze the mechanism of COVID-19 vaccine uptake for effective herd immunity. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34682401/Political_Ideologies_Government_Trust_and_COVID_19_Vaccine_Hesitancy_in_South_Korea:_A_Cross_Sectional_Survey_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph182010655 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -