Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Responses of a Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Service During Military Conflict Versus COVID-19: A Retrospective Comparative Cohort Study.
Mil Med. 2021 Oct 26 [Online ahead of print]MM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Decreases in routine healthcare practices have been shown to occur during disasters. However, research regarding the impacts of natural disasters, pandemics, or military conflicts on emergency medical services (EMS) is scarce.

OBJECTIVES

This study assessed the impact of a military conflict versus the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on a national EMS organization in terms of responses to overall daily emergencies, medical illnesses, motor vehicle collisions, and other injuries.

METHODS

This retrospective comparative cohort study assessed daily routine emergency ambulance calls to Magen David Adom (MDA), Israel's national EMS organization. This included overall emergency calls as well as those related to medical illnesses, motor vehicle collisions (MVCs), and other injuries. All data were obtained from the MDA command and control database. During the military conflict Operation Protective Edge (2014), the civilian population was subjected to intensive rocket attacks for 24 days, followed by 26 days of a progressive withdrawal of operations and then to a post-conflict period. During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (March-April 2020), the population was subjected to 32 days of total lockdown, followed by 27 days of progressive relief of confinement, and then to a post-lockdown period.

RESULTS

The total number of emergency calls in this study was 330,430. During the conflict, the mean number of daily calls decreased, followed by an increase during Relief and Post-Conflict with higher values in Post-Conflict than in Pre-Conflict. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a decrease in the mean daily number of calls during Lockdown. It remained low during Relief and increased during Post-Lockdown. However, it remained lower in Post-Lockdown than during Pre-Lockdown. Calls related to medical illnesses decreased during the conflict and during the lockdown. The post-conflict period was characterized by a similar baseline call magnitude but not during the post-lockdown period. Decreases in calls for MVC and other injuries were significant during the lockdown but not during the military conflict. Post-lockdown was accompanied by return to baseline call volumes for MVC, whereas calls for other injuries increased above baseline both after the lockdown and military conflict.

CONCLUSION

This study shows decreasing trends in routine daily calls for EMS during both Operation Protective Edge and COVID-19. However, different patterns of needs for EMS were evidenced for medical illnesses, MVC, or calls concerning other injuries. These results are instrumental for managing the operational demands of EMS during military conflicts and pandemics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Community Division, Magen David Adom, Or-Yehuda 6021805, Israel. Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 8410501, Israel.Community Division, Magen David Adom, Or-Yehuda 6021805, Israel.Department of Emergency Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem 9103102, Israel. Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9112102, Israel.Community Division, Magen David Adom, Or-Yehuda 6021805, Israel.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34697626

Citation

Jaffe, Eli, et al. "Responses of a Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Service During Military Conflict Versus COVID-19: a Retrospective Comparative Cohort Study." Military Medicine, 2021.
Jaffe E, Sonkin R, Alpert EA, et al. Responses of a Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Service During Military Conflict Versus COVID-19: A Retrospective Comparative Cohort Study. Mil Med. 2021.
Jaffe, E., Sonkin, R., Alpert, E. A., & Zerath, E. (2021). Responses of a Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Service During Military Conflict Versus COVID-19: A Retrospective Comparative Cohort Study. Military Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usab437
Jaffe E, et al. Responses of a Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Service During Military Conflict Versus COVID-19: a Retrospective Comparative Cohort Study. Mil Med. 2021 Oct 26; PubMed PMID: 34697626.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Responses of a Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Service During Military Conflict Versus COVID-19: A Retrospective Comparative Cohort Study. AU - Jaffe,Eli, AU - Sonkin,Roman, AU - Alpert,Evan Avraham, AU - Zerath,Erik, Y1 - 2021/10/26/ PY - 2021/08/02/received PY - 2021/10/01/revised PY - 2021/10/17/accepted PY - 2021/10/26/entrez PY - 2021/10/27/pubmed PY - 2021/10/27/medline JF - Military medicine JO - Mil Med N2 - BACKGROUND: Decreases in routine healthcare practices have been shown to occur during disasters. However, research regarding the impacts of natural disasters, pandemics, or military conflicts on emergency medical services (EMS) is scarce. OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the impact of a military conflict versus the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on a national EMS organization in terms of responses to overall daily emergencies, medical illnesses, motor vehicle collisions, and other injuries. METHODS: This retrospective comparative cohort study assessed daily routine emergency ambulance calls to Magen David Adom (MDA), Israel's national EMS organization. This included overall emergency calls as well as those related to medical illnesses, motor vehicle collisions (MVCs), and other injuries. All data were obtained from the MDA command and control database. During the military conflict Operation Protective Edge (2014), the civilian population was subjected to intensive rocket attacks for 24 days, followed by 26 days of a progressive withdrawal of operations and then to a post-conflict period. During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (March-April 2020), the population was subjected to 32 days of total lockdown, followed by 27 days of progressive relief of confinement, and then to a post-lockdown period. RESULTS: The total number of emergency calls in this study was 330,430. During the conflict, the mean number of daily calls decreased, followed by an increase during Relief and Post-Conflict with higher values in Post-Conflict than in Pre-Conflict. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a decrease in the mean daily number of calls during Lockdown. It remained low during Relief and increased during Post-Lockdown. However, it remained lower in Post-Lockdown than during Pre-Lockdown. Calls related to medical illnesses decreased during the conflict and during the lockdown. The post-conflict period was characterized by a similar baseline call magnitude but not during the post-lockdown period. Decreases in calls for MVC and other injuries were significant during the lockdown but not during the military conflict. Post-lockdown was accompanied by return to baseline call volumes for MVC, whereas calls for other injuries increased above baseline both after the lockdown and military conflict. CONCLUSION: This study shows decreasing trends in routine daily calls for EMS during both Operation Protective Edge and COVID-19. However, different patterns of needs for EMS were evidenced for medical illnesses, MVC, or calls concerning other injuries. These results are instrumental for managing the operational demands of EMS during military conflicts and pandemics. SN - 1930-613X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34697626/Responses_of_a_Pre_hospital_Emergency_Medical_Service_During_Military_Conflict_Versus_COVID_19:_A_Retrospective_Comparative_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/milmed/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/milmed/usab437 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.