Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their associations with intimate partner violence and child maltreatment: Results from a Brazilian birth cohort.
Prev Med. 2022 02; 155:106928.PM

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been found to predict many negative life outcomes. However, very little evidence exists on Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Child Maltreatment (CM). We investigated the impact of maternal ACEs on IPV and CM in three different: cumulative risk, individual adversities and particular groupings of ACEs. The 2015 Pelotas Birth Cohort, Southern Brazil, has followed a population-based sample mothers and children repeatedly until children were aged 4 years, when mothers provided data on ACEs, and current IPV and CM. ACEs were examined in three different ways: (i) as a cumulative risk score; (ii) individual adversities; and (iii) patterns of ACEs (Latent Class Analysis: LCA). One quarter (25.4%) of mothers reported having 5+ ACEs in childhood. Compared to mothers with no ACEs, those who reported 5+ ACEs, had 4.9 (95%CI 3.5; 6.7) times the risk of experiencing IPV and 3.8 (95%CI 2.5; 5.6) times the risk of reporting child maltreatment. LCA results also highlighted the major influence of multiple ACEs on later IPV and CM. However, individual ACEs related to violence (exposure to abuse or domestic violence) showed some specificity for both later IPV and CM, over and above the influence of cumulative childhood adversity. This is the first large study to demonstrate a strong link between maternal ACEs and both IPV and CM. Cumulative ACE exposure and some specificity in effects of childhood violence are important for later IPV and CM. Integrated prevention is essential for reducing the intergenerational transmission of adversity and violence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil; Human Development and Violence Research Centre, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; MRC Integrated Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil; Human Development and Violence Research Centre, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil; Human Development and Violence Research Centre, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil; Human Development and Violence Research Centre, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil. Electronic address: j.murray@doveresearch.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34954240

Citation

Buffarini, Romina, et al. "Maternal Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Their Associations With Intimate Partner Violence and Child Maltreatment: Results From a Brazilian Birth Cohort." Preventive Medicine, vol. 155, 2022, p. 106928.
Buffarini R, Hammerton G, Coll CVN, et al. Maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their associations with intimate partner violence and child maltreatment: Results from a Brazilian birth cohort. Prev Med. 2022;155:106928.
Buffarini, R., Hammerton, G., Coll, C. V. N., Cruz, S., da Silveira, M. F., & Murray, J. (2022). Maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their associations with intimate partner violence and child maltreatment: Results from a Brazilian birth cohort. Preventive Medicine, 155, 106928. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106928
Buffarini R, et al. Maternal Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Their Associations With Intimate Partner Violence and Child Maltreatment: Results From a Brazilian Birth Cohort. Prev Med. 2022;155:106928. PubMed PMID: 34954240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their associations with intimate partner violence and child maltreatment: Results from a Brazilian birth cohort. AU - Buffarini,Romina, AU - Hammerton,Gemma, AU - Coll,Carolina V N, AU - Cruz,Suelen, AU - da Silveira,Mariângela Freitas, AU - Murray,Joseph, Y1 - 2021/12/23/ PY - 2021/06/07/received PY - 2021/11/11/revised PY - 2021/12/19/accepted PY - 2021/12/27/pubmed PY - 2022/4/14/medline PY - 2021/12/26/entrez KW - Adverse childhood experiences KW - Child maltreatment KW - Cohort studies KW - Intimate partner violence KW - Women SP - 106928 EP - 106928 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 155 N2 - Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been found to predict many negative life outcomes. However, very little evidence exists on Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Child Maltreatment (CM). We investigated the impact of maternal ACEs on IPV and CM in three different: cumulative risk, individual adversities and particular groupings of ACEs. The 2015 Pelotas Birth Cohort, Southern Brazil, has followed a population-based sample mothers and children repeatedly until children were aged 4 years, when mothers provided data on ACEs, and current IPV and CM. ACEs were examined in three different ways: (i) as a cumulative risk score; (ii) individual adversities; and (iii) patterns of ACEs (Latent Class Analysis: LCA). One quarter (25.4%) of mothers reported having 5+ ACEs in childhood. Compared to mothers with no ACEs, those who reported 5+ ACEs, had 4.9 (95%CI 3.5; 6.7) times the risk of experiencing IPV and 3.8 (95%CI 2.5; 5.6) times the risk of reporting child maltreatment. LCA results also highlighted the major influence of multiple ACEs on later IPV and CM. However, individual ACEs related to violence (exposure to abuse or domestic violence) showed some specificity for both later IPV and CM, over and above the influence of cumulative childhood adversity. This is the first large study to demonstrate a strong link between maternal ACEs and both IPV and CM. Cumulative ACE exposure and some specificity in effects of childhood violence are important for later IPV and CM. Integrated prevention is essential for reducing the intergenerational transmission of adversity and violence. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34954240/Maternal_adverse_childhood_experiences__ACEs__and_their_associations_with_intimate_partner_violence_and_child_maltreatment:_Results_from_a_Brazilian_birth_cohort_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(21)00501-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -