Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions Among College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study in India.
Front Public Health. 2021; 9:735902.FP

Abstract

Background: Students act as messengers in delivering effective messages for better uptake of health-promoting behavior. Understanding their knowledge about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), intentions to use the COVID-19 vaccine, and its associated factors will help develop promising strategies in vaccine promotion concerning the current COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was carried out among students in the healthcare and non-healthcare sectors to assess their intentions to get vaccinated against the COVID-19. A non-probability snowball sampling technique was used to recruit study participants (N = 655) through social media platforms and emails. Study participants were recruited across the country, including six major geographical regions (Eastern, Western, Northern, Southern, North-east, and Central) in India between November 2020 and January 2021 before the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine. Descriptive statistics were used to present the sociodemographic, and vaccine-related behaviors of the study participants. Key determinants that likely predict vaccine acceptance among students were modeled using logistic regression analysis. For each analysis, p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 655 students were recruited, 323 from healthcare and 332 from non-healthcare sectors, to assess their intentions to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Of the 655 students, 63.8% expressed intentions to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. The acceptance was higher among non-healthcare students (54.07 vs. 45.93%). At the time of the study, 27.8% of the students indicated that they had been exposed to a confirmed COVID-19 patient. A vast majority (93.4%) of the students knew about the COVID-19 virus, and most (89.3%) of them were aware of the development of a COVID-19 vaccine. The history of vaccine hesitancy was found to be low (17.1%). Only one-third (33.4%) of the students showed concern about contracting COVID-19. Trust in the healthcare system [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 4.13; (95% CI: 2.83-6.04), p < 0.00] and trust in domestic vaccines [aOR: 1.46; (95% CI: 1.02-2.08), p < 0.05] emerged as the significant predictors of student's intention to get vaccinated. Higher acceptance for vaccine was observed among students in the non-healthcare [aOR: 1.982; 95% CI: 1.334-2.946, p < 0.00]. Conclusion: This study shows that the Indian college students had relatively high levels of positive intentions to receive COVID-19 vaccines, although about one-third were not sure or unwilling to receive the vaccine, highlighting possible vaccine hesitancy. Informational campaigns and other strategies to address vaccine hesitancy are needed to promote uptake of COVID-19 vaccines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.Department of Public Health, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar, India.Centre for Sexuality and Health Research and Policy (C-SHaRP), Chennai, India.Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Bhubaneswar, India.Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, India.Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Kalyani, India.Department of Community Medicine, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences (NEIGRIHMS), Shillong, India.Grant Medical College, JJ Hospital, Mumbai, India.Community Medicine Health & Family Welfare Department, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, India.Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Bhopal, India.Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Medical Research Public University, Jodhpur, India.Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34976911

Citation

Jain, Lovely, et al. "Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions Among College Students: a Cross-Sectional Study in India." Frontiers in Public Health, vol. 9, 2021, p. 735902.
Jain L, Vij J, Satapathy P, et al. Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions Among College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study in India. Front Public Health. 2021;9:735902.
Jain, L., Vij, J., Satapathy, P., Chakrapani, V., Patro, B., Kar, S. S., Singh, R., Pala, S., Sankhe, L., Modi, B., Bali, S., Rustagi, N., Rajagopal, V., Kiran, T., Goel, K., Aggarwal, A. K., Gupta, M., & Padhi, B. K. (2021). Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions Among College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study in India. Frontiers in Public Health, 9, 735902. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2021.735902
Jain L, et al. Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions Among College Students: a Cross-Sectional Study in India. Front Public Health. 2021;9:735902. PubMed PMID: 34976911.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors Influencing COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions Among College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study in India. AU - Jain,Lovely, AU - Vij,Jatina, AU - Satapathy,Prakasini, AU - Chakrapani,Venkatesan, AU - Patro,Binod, AU - Kar,Sitanshu Sekhar, AU - Singh,Ritesh, AU - Pala,Star, AU - Sankhe,Lalit, AU - Modi,Bhavesh, AU - Bali,Surya, AU - Rustagi,Neeti, AU - Rajagopal,Vineeth, AU - Kiran,Tanvi, AU - Goel,Kapil, AU - Aggarwal,Arun Kumar, AU - Gupta,Madhu, AU - Padhi,Bijaya Kumar, Y1 - 2021/12/15/ PY - 2021/07/03/received PY - 2021/11/11/accepted PY - 2022/1/3/entrez PY - 2022/1/4/pubmed PY - 2022/1/8/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - first wave KW - students KW - vaccine hesitancy KW - vaccine intention KW - vaccine uptake SP - 735902 EP - 735902 JF - Frontiers in public health JO - Front Public Health VL - 9 N2 - Background: Students act as messengers in delivering effective messages for better uptake of health-promoting behavior. Understanding their knowledge about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), intentions to use the COVID-19 vaccine, and its associated factors will help develop promising strategies in vaccine promotion concerning the current COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was carried out among students in the healthcare and non-healthcare sectors to assess their intentions to get vaccinated against the COVID-19. A non-probability snowball sampling technique was used to recruit study participants (N = 655) through social media platforms and emails. Study participants were recruited across the country, including six major geographical regions (Eastern, Western, Northern, Southern, North-east, and Central) in India between November 2020 and January 2021 before the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine. Descriptive statistics were used to present the sociodemographic, and vaccine-related behaviors of the study participants. Key determinants that likely predict vaccine acceptance among students were modeled using logistic regression analysis. For each analysis, p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 655 students were recruited, 323 from healthcare and 332 from non-healthcare sectors, to assess their intentions to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Of the 655 students, 63.8% expressed intentions to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. The acceptance was higher among non-healthcare students (54.07 vs. 45.93%). At the time of the study, 27.8% of the students indicated that they had been exposed to a confirmed COVID-19 patient. A vast majority (93.4%) of the students knew about the COVID-19 virus, and most (89.3%) of them were aware of the development of a COVID-19 vaccine. The history of vaccine hesitancy was found to be low (17.1%). Only one-third (33.4%) of the students showed concern about contracting COVID-19. Trust in the healthcare system [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 4.13; (95% CI: 2.83-6.04), p < 0.00] and trust in domestic vaccines [aOR: 1.46; (95% CI: 1.02-2.08), p < 0.05] emerged as the significant predictors of student's intention to get vaccinated. Higher acceptance for vaccine was observed among students in the non-healthcare [aOR: 1.982; 95% CI: 1.334-2.946, p < 0.00]. Conclusion: This study shows that the Indian college students had relatively high levels of positive intentions to receive COVID-19 vaccines, although about one-third were not sure or unwilling to receive the vaccine, highlighting possible vaccine hesitancy. Informational campaigns and other strategies to address vaccine hesitancy are needed to promote uptake of COVID-19 vaccines. SN - 2296-2565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34976911/Factors_Influencing_COVID_19_Vaccination_Intentions_Among_College_Students:_A_Cross_Sectional_Study_in_India_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2021.735902 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -