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Evidence of hepatitis virus infection among Australian prisoners of war during World War II.
Med J Aust. 1987 Sep 07; 147(5):229-30.MJ

Abstract

A sample of Australian male veterans of World War II was surveyed after 40 years. One hundred and seventy veterans had been held by the Japanese as prisoners of war and 172 veterans had served in southeast Asia but had not been taken captive (non-prisoners of war). A medical history was obtained and a physical examination undertaken. Blood was drawn and analysed for standard liver biochemistry and serological markers of hepatitis A and B virus (HAV, HBV) infections. The prevalence of immunoglobulin (Ig)G class antibodies to HAV was 95.2% in non-prisoners of war and 93.3% in prisoners of war. Only three cases of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seropositivity were identified (two cases from the prisoner-of-war group). Thirty-six (21.8%) prisoners of war were seropositive for the presence of antibodies to HBsAg (anti-HBs) and 34 (20.0%) prisoners of war for that of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), compared with 16 (9.8%) and eight (4.7%) of the non-prisoners of war, respectively (P = 0.002 and P = 0.0001, respectively). Those veterans who reported jaundice during World War II had a higher prevalence of antibodies to HBV. Among prisoners of war who were forced to work on the Burma-Thailand railway, 24.1% were seropositive for anti-HBc compared with 11.1% of the remaining prisoners of war (P = 0.048). It would appear that hepatitis B was common in prisoners of war but that those who survived 40 years were able to clear the virus and do not appear to have significant liver disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gastroenterology Unit, Repatriation General Hospital Concord, NSW.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3499558

Citation

Smith, C I., et al. "Evidence of Hepatitis Virus Infection Among Australian Prisoners of War During World War II." The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 147, no. 5, 1987, pp. 229-30.
Smith CI, Patterson F, Goulston KJ, et al. Evidence of hepatitis virus infection among Australian prisoners of war during World War II. Med J Aust. 1987;147(5):229-30.
Smith, C. I., Patterson, F., Goulston, K. J., Chapuis, P. H., Chapman, G., Tait, A. D., & Dent, O. F. (1987). Evidence of hepatitis virus infection among Australian prisoners of war during World War II. The Medical Journal of Australia, 147(5), 229-30.
Smith CI, et al. Evidence of Hepatitis Virus Infection Among Australian Prisoners of War During World War II. Med J Aust. 1987 Sep 7;147(5):229-30. PubMed PMID: 3499558.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence of hepatitis virus infection among Australian prisoners of war during World War II. AU - Smith,C I, AU - Patterson,F, AU - Goulston,K J, AU - Chapuis,P H, AU - Chapman,G, AU - Tait,A D, AU - Dent,O F, PY - 1987/9/7/pubmed PY - 1987/9/7/medline PY - 1987/9/7/entrez SP - 229 EP - 30 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med. J. Aust. VL - 147 IS - 5 N2 - A sample of Australian male veterans of World War II was surveyed after 40 years. One hundred and seventy veterans had been held by the Japanese as prisoners of war and 172 veterans had served in southeast Asia but had not been taken captive (non-prisoners of war). A medical history was obtained and a physical examination undertaken. Blood was drawn and analysed for standard liver biochemistry and serological markers of hepatitis A and B virus (HAV, HBV) infections. The prevalence of immunoglobulin (Ig)G class antibodies to HAV was 95.2% in non-prisoners of war and 93.3% in prisoners of war. Only three cases of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seropositivity were identified (two cases from the prisoner-of-war group). Thirty-six (21.8%) prisoners of war were seropositive for the presence of antibodies to HBsAg (anti-HBs) and 34 (20.0%) prisoners of war for that of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), compared with 16 (9.8%) and eight (4.7%) of the non-prisoners of war, respectively (P = 0.002 and P = 0.0001, respectively). Those veterans who reported jaundice during World War II had a higher prevalence of antibodies to HBV. Among prisoners of war who were forced to work on the Burma-Thailand railway, 24.1% were seropositive for anti-HBc compared with 11.1% of the remaining prisoners of war (P = 0.048). It would appear that hepatitis B was common in prisoners of war but that those who survived 40 years were able to clear the virus and do not appear to have significant liver disease. SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3499558/Evidence_of_hepatitis_virus_infection_among_Australian_prisoners_of_war_during_World_War_II_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0025-729X&date=1987&volume=147&issue=5&spage=229 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -