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Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Childhood Physical Abuse and Mental Health of U.S. Caribbean Women: The Interrelationship of Social, Contextual, and Migratory Influences.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 12 23; 19(1)IJ

Abstract

The literature has shown an increased risk for mental health conditions among victims of domestic violence. Few studies have examined the relationship between mental health disorders and domestic violence among Caribbean women, and how the association might be influenced by migratory and contextual factors. This study addresses the mental well-being of U.S. Caribbean Black women victims of domestic violence, and the relationships between acculturation, discrimination, and demographic influences. An analysis of data from the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Life (NSAL) re-interview, the first and most complete study on U.S. Caribbean Blacks, was conducted. Bivariate analysis revealed an association between acts of physical domestic violence and mental health conditions, with generally higher risk among women who reported both severe physical intimate partner violence and childhood physical abuse. Multivariate logistic regression indicates an association between specific mental disorders and acts of domestic violence. Acculturation, length of residence in the United States, age, education, poverty, and country of origin were also associated with mental health. The study highlights future directions for exploration including additional investigation of the influence of acculturation on the physical health of victims of domestic violence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology and African and African American Studies, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, MI 48128, USA.Department of Occupational Therapy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.Department of Behavioral Sciences, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI 48502, USA.Department of Humanities, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada.Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Denison University, Granville, OH 43023, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35010409

Citation

Lacey, Krim K., et al. "Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Childhood Physical Abuse and Mental Health of U.S. Caribbean Women: the Interrelationship of Social, Contextual, and Migratory Influences." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 19, no. 1, 2021.
Lacey KK, Parnell R, Drummond-Lewis SR, et al. Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Childhood Physical Abuse and Mental Health of U.S. Caribbean Women: The Interrelationship of Social, Contextual, and Migratory Influences. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;19(1).
Lacey, K. K., Parnell, R., Drummond-Lewis, S. R., Wood, M., & Powell Sears, K. (2021). Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Childhood Physical Abuse and Mental Health of U.S. Caribbean Women: The Interrelationship of Social, Contextual, and Migratory Influences. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010150
Lacey KK, et al. Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Childhood Physical Abuse and Mental Health of U.S. Caribbean Women: the Interrelationship of Social, Contextual, and Migratory Influences. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 12 23;19(1) PubMed PMID: 35010409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Childhood Physical Abuse and Mental Health of U.S. Caribbean Women: The Interrelationship of Social, Contextual, and Migratory Influences. AU - Lacey,Krim K, AU - Parnell,Regina, AU - Drummond-Lewis,Sasha R, AU - Wood,Maxine, AU - Powell Sears,Karen, Y1 - 2021/12/23/ PY - 2021/10/31/received PY - 2021/12/15/revised PY - 2021/12/17/accepted PY - 2022/1/11/entrez PY - 2022/1/12/pubmed PY - 2022/1/12/medline KW - acculturation KW - childhood physical abuse KW - discrimination KW - mental health KW - physical IPV JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - The literature has shown an increased risk for mental health conditions among victims of domestic violence. Few studies have examined the relationship between mental health disorders and domestic violence among Caribbean women, and how the association might be influenced by migratory and contextual factors. This study addresses the mental well-being of U.S. Caribbean Black women victims of domestic violence, and the relationships between acculturation, discrimination, and demographic influences. An analysis of data from the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Life (NSAL) re-interview, the first and most complete study on U.S. Caribbean Blacks, was conducted. Bivariate analysis revealed an association between acts of physical domestic violence and mental health conditions, with generally higher risk among women who reported both severe physical intimate partner violence and childhood physical abuse. Multivariate logistic regression indicates an association between specific mental disorders and acts of domestic violence. Acculturation, length of residence in the United States, age, education, poverty, and country of origin were also associated with mental health. The study highlights future directions for exploration including additional investigation of the influence of acculturation on the physical health of victims of domestic violence. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35010409/Physical_Intimate_Partner_Violence_Childhood_Physical_Abuse_and_Mental_Health_of_U_S__Caribbean_Women:_The_Interrelationship_of_Social_Contextual_and_Migratory_Influences_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph19010150 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -