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Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination for Hispanics in the United States: A Success Story from California Border Communities.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 01 04; 19(1)IJ

Abstract

The ongoing 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic continues to impact the health of individuals worldwide, including causing pauses in lifesaving cancer screening and prevention measures. From time to time, elective medical procedures, such as those used for cancer screening and early detection, were deferred due to concerns regarding the spread of the infection. The short- and long-term consequences of these temporary measures are concerning, particularly for medically underserved populations, who already experience inequities and disparities related to timely cancer care. Clearly, the way out of this pandemic is by increasing COVID-19 vaccination rates and doing so in an equitable manner so that communities most affected receive preferential access and administration. In this article, we provide a perspective on vaccine equity by featuring the experience of the California Hispanic community, who has been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. We first compared vaccination rates in two United States-Mexico border counties in California (San Diego County and Imperial County) to counties elsewhere in California with a similar Hispanic population size. We show that the border counties have substantially lower unvaccinated proportions of Hispanics compared to other counties. We next looked at county vaccination rates according to the California Healthy Places Index, a health equity metric and found that San Diego and Imperial counties achieved more equitable access and distribution than the rest of the state. Finally, we detail strategies implemented to achieve high and equitable vaccination in this border region, including Imperial County, an agricultural region that was California's epicenter of the COVID-19 crisis at the height of the pandemic. These United States-Mexico border county data show that equitable vaccine access and delivery is possible. Multiple strategies can be used to guide the delivery and access to other public health and cancer preventive services.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.Institute for Public Health, School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92020, USA. School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA.School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA.El Centro Regional Medical Center, El Centro, CA 92243, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35010795

Citation

Martinez, Maria Elena, et al. "Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination for Hispanics in the United States: a Success Story From California Border Communities." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 19, no. 1, 2022.
Martinez ME, Nodora JN, McDaniels-Davidson C, et al. Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination for Hispanics in the United States: A Success Story from California Border Communities. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19(1).
Martinez, M. E., Nodora, J. N., McDaniels-Davidson, C., Crespo, N. C., & Edward, A. A. (2022). Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination for Hispanics in the United States: A Success Story from California Border Communities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010535
Martinez ME, et al. Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination for Hispanics in the United States: a Success Story From California Border Communities. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022 01 4;19(1) PubMed PMID: 35010795.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Equitable COVID-19 Vaccination for Hispanics in the United States: A Success Story from California Border Communities. AU - Martinez,Maria Elena, AU - Nodora,Jesse N, AU - McDaniels-Davidson,Corinne, AU - Crespo,Noe C, AU - Edward,Amir Adolphe, Y1 - 2022/01/04/ PY - 2021/09/27/received PY - 2021/12/29/revised PY - 2022/01/01/accepted PY - 2022/1/11/entrez PY - 2022/1/12/pubmed PY - 2022/1/14/medline KW - 2019 novel coronavirus disease KW - cancer prevention KW - health disparities KW - vaccine equity JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - The ongoing 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic continues to impact the health of individuals worldwide, including causing pauses in lifesaving cancer screening and prevention measures. From time to time, elective medical procedures, such as those used for cancer screening and early detection, were deferred due to concerns regarding the spread of the infection. The short- and long-term consequences of these temporary measures are concerning, particularly for medically underserved populations, who already experience inequities and disparities related to timely cancer care. Clearly, the way out of this pandemic is by increasing COVID-19 vaccination rates and doing so in an equitable manner so that communities most affected receive preferential access and administration. In this article, we provide a perspective on vaccine equity by featuring the experience of the California Hispanic community, who has been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. We first compared vaccination rates in two United States-Mexico border counties in California (San Diego County and Imperial County) to counties elsewhere in California with a similar Hispanic population size. We show that the border counties have substantially lower unvaccinated proportions of Hispanics compared to other counties. We next looked at county vaccination rates according to the California Healthy Places Index, a health equity metric and found that San Diego and Imperial counties achieved more equitable access and distribution than the rest of the state. Finally, we detail strategies implemented to achieve high and equitable vaccination in this border region, including Imperial County, an agricultural region that was California's epicenter of the COVID-19 crisis at the height of the pandemic. These United States-Mexico border county data show that equitable vaccine access and delivery is possible. Multiple strategies can be used to guide the delivery and access to other public health and cancer preventive services. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35010795/Equitable_COVID_19_Vaccination_for_Hispanics_in_the_United_States:_A_Success_Story_from_California_Border_Communities_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph19010535 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -