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Thyroid disorders in the general population of Hisayama Japan, with special reference to prevalence and sex differences.
Int J Epidemiol. 1987 Dec; 16(4):545-9.IJ

Abstract

Serum triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid autoantibodies (TAA) to either microsome or thyroglobulin were measured in 1251 samples from the general population, 546 males and 705 females, aged 40 or over in Hisayama, a Japanese rural town. TAA was positive in 7.7% of men and 15.0% of women, and the male/female ratio was 1:2. This ratio was markedly different from those in hospital patients with thyroid disorders where ratios such as 1:8 for chronic thyroiditis and 1:4 for Graves' disease were found. Among the study subjects, definite hyperthyroidism was found in 0.2%, borderline hyperthyroidism in 0.7%, overt hypothyroidism in 0.3%, latent hypothyroidism in 4.2%, and non-thyroid illness in 2.4%. Overt thyroid dysfunction was more evident in women, while latent thyroid dysfunction or non-thyroidal illness was equally prevalent in men and women. These results indicate that the incidence of immunologically or functionally latent thyroid disorders is rather higher than expected, in both women and men. Some unknown factor(s) might act as a trigger to manifest thyroid dysfunction, mainly in females.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Second Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3501990

Citation

Okamura, K, et al. "Thyroid Disorders in the General Population of Hisayama Japan, With Special Reference to Prevalence and Sex Differences." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 16, no. 4, 1987, pp. 545-9.
Okamura K, Nakashima T, Ueda K, et al. Thyroid disorders in the general population of Hisayama Japan, with special reference to prevalence and sex differences. Int J Epidemiol. 1987;16(4):545-9.
Okamura, K., Nakashima, T., Ueda, K., Inoue, K., Omae, T., & Fujishima, M. (1987). Thyroid disorders in the general population of Hisayama Japan, with special reference to prevalence and sex differences. International Journal of Epidemiology, 16(4), 545-9.
Okamura K, et al. Thyroid Disorders in the General Population of Hisayama Japan, With Special Reference to Prevalence and Sex Differences. Int J Epidemiol. 1987;16(4):545-9. PubMed PMID: 3501990.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thyroid disorders in the general population of Hisayama Japan, with special reference to prevalence and sex differences. AU - Okamura,K, AU - Nakashima,T, AU - Ueda,K, AU - Inoue,K, AU - Omae,T, AU - Fujishima,M, PY - 1987/12/1/pubmed PY - 1987/12/1/medline PY - 1987/12/1/entrez SP - 545 EP - 9 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - Serum triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid autoantibodies (TAA) to either microsome or thyroglobulin were measured in 1251 samples from the general population, 546 males and 705 females, aged 40 or over in Hisayama, a Japanese rural town. TAA was positive in 7.7% of men and 15.0% of women, and the male/female ratio was 1:2. This ratio was markedly different from those in hospital patients with thyroid disorders where ratios such as 1:8 for chronic thyroiditis and 1:4 for Graves' disease were found. Among the study subjects, definite hyperthyroidism was found in 0.2%, borderline hyperthyroidism in 0.7%, overt hypothyroidism in 0.3%, latent hypothyroidism in 4.2%, and non-thyroid illness in 2.4%. Overt thyroid dysfunction was more evident in women, while latent thyroid dysfunction or non-thyroidal illness was equally prevalent in men and women. These results indicate that the incidence of immunologically or functionally latent thyroid disorders is rather higher than expected, in both women and men. Some unknown factor(s) might act as a trigger to manifest thyroid dysfunction, mainly in females. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3501990/Thyroid_disorders_in_the_general_population_of_Hisayama_Japan_with_special_reference_to_prevalence_and_sex_differences_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/16.4.545 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -