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Evidence that obesity does not influence the vitamin D-endocrine system in blacks.
J Bone Miner Res 1986; 1(2):181-4JB

Abstract

As compared to nonobese white men and women, age-matched nonobese black subjects and obese white individuals show alterations in the vitamin D-endocrine system that are characterized by increases in mean serum immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D], and urinary cyclic adenosine 3,5-monophosphate (cAMP) and by decreases in mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25 OHD) and in urinary calcium. Thus, both groups show secondary hyperparathyroidism which is associated with increased renal tubular reabsorption of calcium and increased renal synthesis of 1,25-(OH)2D. In view of these findings, studies were conducted in 10 obese black subjects (3 men and 7 women) and in 12 nonobese black individuals (7 men and 5 women), ranging in age from 20 to 35 yr, to determine whether obesity influences the vitamin D-endocrine system in blacks. Body weight averaged 99 +/- 4 kg in the obese and 73 +/- 3 kg in the nonobese subjects (p less than .001). All of them were hospitalized on a metabolic ward and were given a constant daily diet containing 400 mg of calcium, 900 mg of phosphorus, 110 meq of sodium, 65 meq of potassium, and 18 meq of magnesium.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 55901.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3503535

Citation

Epstein, S, et al. "Evidence That Obesity Does Not Influence the Vitamin D-endocrine System in Blacks." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 1, no. 2, 1986, pp. 181-4.
Epstein S, Bell NH, Shary J, et al. Evidence that obesity does not influence the vitamin D-endocrine system in blacks. J Bone Miner Res. 1986;1(2):181-4.
Epstein, S., Bell, N. H., Shary, J., Shaw, S., Greene, A., & Oexmann, M. J. (1986). Evidence that obesity does not influence the vitamin D-endocrine system in blacks. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 1(2), pp. 181-4.
Epstein S, et al. Evidence That Obesity Does Not Influence the Vitamin D-endocrine System in Blacks. J Bone Miner Res. 1986;1(2):181-4. PubMed PMID: 3503535.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence that obesity does not influence the vitamin D-endocrine system in blacks. AU - Epstein,S, AU - Bell,N H, AU - Shary,J, AU - Shaw,S, AU - Greene,A, AU - Oexmann,M J, PY - 1986/4/1/pubmed PY - 1986/4/1/medline PY - 1986/4/1/entrez SP - 181 EP - 4 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 1 IS - 2 N2 - As compared to nonobese white men and women, age-matched nonobese black subjects and obese white individuals show alterations in the vitamin D-endocrine system that are characterized by increases in mean serum immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D], and urinary cyclic adenosine 3,5-monophosphate (cAMP) and by decreases in mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25 OHD) and in urinary calcium. Thus, both groups show secondary hyperparathyroidism which is associated with increased renal tubular reabsorption of calcium and increased renal synthesis of 1,25-(OH)2D. In view of these findings, studies were conducted in 10 obese black subjects (3 men and 7 women) and in 12 nonobese black individuals (7 men and 5 women), ranging in age from 20 to 35 yr, to determine whether obesity influences the vitamin D-endocrine system in blacks. Body weight averaged 99 +/- 4 kg in the obese and 73 +/- 3 kg in the nonobese subjects (p less than .001). All of them were hospitalized on a metabolic ward and were given a constant daily diet containing 400 mg of calcium, 900 mg of phosphorus, 110 meq of sodium, 65 meq of potassium, and 18 meq of magnesium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3503535/Evidence_that_obesity_does_not_influence_the_vitamin_D_endocrine_system_in_blacks_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.5650010203 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -