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Determinants of undernutrition among private and public primary school children: A comparative cross-sectional study toward nutritional transition in northwest Ethiopia.
Nutrition. 2022 04; 96:111575.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Undernutrition is a major public health concern, particularly in children. The burden is higher in developing countries. Undernutrition is considered when there is one or more of the following: stunting, underweight, or wasting. Childhood undernutrition can have numerous long-term effects: a lower physical capacity for work, lower intellectual quotients, greater risk for morbidity and mortality, and cognitive impairment. Undernourished children also can have poor cognitive scores, a high absenteeism rate, and high class repetition compared with non-undernourished children. The aim of this study was to assess undernutrition and its associated factors among public and private primary school children in Gondar town, northwest Ethiopia.

METHODS

A school-based, cross-sectional study was conducted from March 5 to April 9, 2019. A multistage sampling technique was applied to select study participants. A simple random (lottery) sampling method was used to select seven public schools and five private schools. Systematic random sampling was used to select 774 study participants. The data were collected through face-to-face interviews. Multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to identify factors associated with undernutrition. The World Health Organization (WHO) AnthroPlus software was used to determine the status of undernutrition. Participants with a Z-score less than -2 were considered to be undernourished. Statistical significance was declared at P < 0.05 and odds ratios (ORs) were reported with a 95% confidence interval (CI).

RESULTS

The prevalence of undernutrition was higher among public school children (37.1%) than those attending private schools (28.3%). Not having family car (adjusted OR [aOR], 0.28; 95% CI, 0.09-0.84), snack frequency no more than twice a day (aOR, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.37-20.37), and vigorous intensity sports (aOR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.32-0.91) were significantly associated with undernutrition among public primary school students. Family income below the median (aOR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.23-3.53), no preference for sweets (aOR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36-0.97), and not habits while reading (aOR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.19-0.89) were the factors significantly associated with undernutrition among private primary school students.

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of undernutrition was high. Children in public schools were highly vulnerable to undernutrition compared with those in private schools. Not having a family car, snack frequency no more than twice daily, and vigorous intensity sports increase the risk for undernutrition among public school children. Family income below the median, not preferring sweets, and not having a habit of eating while reading increase the risk for undernutrition among private school children. It is better to give attention to healthy dietary habits and healthy lifestyles to reduce childhood undernutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics and Child Health Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia. Electronic address: muheseid2592@gmail.com.Department of Adult Health Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Emergency and Critical Care Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35077915

Citation

Ali, Mohammed Seid, et al. "Determinants of Undernutrition Among Private and Public Primary School Children: a Comparative Cross-sectional Study Toward Nutritional Transition in Northwest Ethiopia." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 96, 2022, p. 111575.
Ali MS, Kassahun CW, Wubneh CA, et al. Determinants of undernutrition among private and public primary school children: A comparative cross-sectional study toward nutritional transition in northwest Ethiopia. Nutrition. 2022;96:111575.
Ali, M. S., Kassahun, C. W., Wubneh, C. A., Mekonen, E. G., & Workneh, B. S. (2022). Determinants of undernutrition among private and public primary school children: A comparative cross-sectional study toward nutritional transition in northwest Ethiopia. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 96, 111575. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2021.111575
Ali MS, et al. Determinants of Undernutrition Among Private and Public Primary School Children: a Comparative Cross-sectional Study Toward Nutritional Transition in Northwest Ethiopia. Nutrition. 2022;96:111575. PubMed PMID: 35077915.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Determinants of undernutrition among private and public primary school children: A comparative cross-sectional study toward nutritional transition in northwest Ethiopia. AU - Ali,Mohammed Seid, AU - Kassahun,Chanyalew Worku, AU - Wubneh,Chalachew Adugna, AU - Mekonen,Enyew Getaneh, AU - Workneh,Belayneh Shetie, Y1 - 2021/12/22/ PY - 2021/08/28/received PY - 2021/11/29/revised PY - 2021/12/12/accepted PY - 2022/1/26/pubmed PY - 2022/4/13/medline PY - 2022/1/25/entrez KW - Eating habits KW - Food preference KW - Lifestyle KW - Northwest Ethiopia KW - Undernutrition SP - 111575 EP - 111575 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 96 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Undernutrition is a major public health concern, particularly in children. The burden is higher in developing countries. Undernutrition is considered when there is one or more of the following: stunting, underweight, or wasting. Childhood undernutrition can have numerous long-term effects: a lower physical capacity for work, lower intellectual quotients, greater risk for morbidity and mortality, and cognitive impairment. Undernourished children also can have poor cognitive scores, a high absenteeism rate, and high class repetition compared with non-undernourished children. The aim of this study was to assess undernutrition and its associated factors among public and private primary school children in Gondar town, northwest Ethiopia. METHODS: A school-based, cross-sectional study was conducted from March 5 to April 9, 2019. A multistage sampling technique was applied to select study participants. A simple random (lottery) sampling method was used to select seven public schools and five private schools. Systematic random sampling was used to select 774 study participants. The data were collected through face-to-face interviews. Multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to identify factors associated with undernutrition. The World Health Organization (WHO) AnthroPlus software was used to determine the status of undernutrition. Participants with a Z-score less than -2 were considered to be undernourished. Statistical significance was declared at P < 0.05 and odds ratios (ORs) were reported with a 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: The prevalence of undernutrition was higher among public school children (37.1%) than those attending private schools (28.3%). Not having family car (adjusted OR [aOR], 0.28; 95% CI, 0.09-0.84), snack frequency no more than twice a day (aOR, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.37-20.37), and vigorous intensity sports (aOR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.32-0.91) were significantly associated with undernutrition among public primary school students. Family income below the median (aOR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.23-3.53), no preference for sweets (aOR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36-0.97), and not habits while reading (aOR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.19-0.89) were the factors significantly associated with undernutrition among private primary school students. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of undernutrition was high. Children in public schools were highly vulnerable to undernutrition compared with those in private schools. Not having a family car, snack frequency no more than twice daily, and vigorous intensity sports increase the risk for undernutrition among public school children. Family income below the median, not preferring sweets, and not having a habit of eating while reading increase the risk for undernutrition among private school children. It is better to give attention to healthy dietary habits and healthy lifestyles to reduce childhood undernutrition. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35077915/Determinants_of_undernutrition_among_private_and_public_primary_school_children:_A_comparative_cross_sectional_study_toward_nutritional_transition_in_northwest_Ethiopia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(21)00437-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -