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Dietary magnesium supplementation inhibits abdominal vascular calcification in an experimental animal model of chronic kidney disease.
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2022 05 25; 37(6):1049-1058.ND

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Vascular calcification is a key process involved in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Magnesium supplementation may counteract vascular calcification. In this study we aimed to determine whether increased dietary magnesium intake inhibits vascular calcification in CKD in vivo and explore the mechanisms underlying these effects.

METHODS

Sprague Dawley rats were partially nephrectomized and fed a diet with high phosphate and either high or normal magnesium content for 16 weeks. The primary outcome was the tissue calcium content of the aorta in the high versus normal dietary magnesium group. In addition, we analysed plasma mineral concentrations, aortic vascular calcification identified with von Kossa staining, calcium apposition time and aortic expression of genes related to vascular calcification.

RESULTS

The number of animals in the highest tissue calcium content tertile was significantly lower in the abdominal aorta [1 (10%) versus 6 (55%); P = .03] in the high versus normal dietary magnesium group, but did not differ in the aortic arch and thoracic aorta. Von Kossa staining and calcium apposition time corresponded to these results. The median tissue calcium content was not significantly different between the groups. Serum phosphate concentrations and expression of osteogenic markers in the aorta did not differ between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates that increased dietary magnesium inhibits abdominal vascular calcification in an experimental animal model of CKD in vivo. These are promising results for CKD patients and further study is needed to identify the mechanisms involved and to determine the clinical relevance in patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nephrology, Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department of Physiology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Physiology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Nephrology, Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Department of Nephrology, Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Physiology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35134986

Citation

Leenders, Nicoline H J., et al. "Dietary Magnesium Supplementation Inhibits Abdominal Vascular Calcification in an Experimental Animal Model of Chronic Kidney Disease." Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, vol. 37, no. 6, 2022, pp. 1049-1058.
Leenders NHJ, Bos C, Hoekstra T, et al. Dietary magnesium supplementation inhibits abdominal vascular calcification in an experimental animal model of chronic kidney disease. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2022;37(6):1049-1058.
Leenders, N. H. J., Bos, C., Hoekstra, T., Schurgers, L. J., Vervloet, M. G., & Hoenderop, J. G. J. (2022). Dietary magnesium supplementation inhibits abdominal vascular calcification in an experimental animal model of chronic kidney disease. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, 37(6), 1049-1058. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfac026
Leenders NHJ, et al. Dietary Magnesium Supplementation Inhibits Abdominal Vascular Calcification in an Experimental Animal Model of Chronic Kidney Disease. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2022 05 25;37(6):1049-1058. PubMed PMID: 35134986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary magnesium supplementation inhibits abdominal vascular calcification in an experimental animal model of chronic kidney disease. AU - Leenders,Nicoline H J, AU - Bos,Caro, AU - Hoekstra,Tiny, AU - Schurgers,Leon J, AU - Vervloet,Marc G, AU - Hoenderop,Joost G J, PY - 2021/07/09/received PY - 2022/2/9/pubmed PY - 2022/5/27/medline PY - 2022/2/8/entrez KW - chronic kidney disease (CKD) KW - magnesium KW - vascular calcification SP - 1049 EP - 1058 JF - Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association JO - Nephrol Dial Transplant VL - 37 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Vascular calcification is a key process involved in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Magnesium supplementation may counteract vascular calcification. In this study we aimed to determine whether increased dietary magnesium intake inhibits vascular calcification in CKD in vivo and explore the mechanisms underlying these effects. METHODS: Sprague Dawley rats were partially nephrectomized and fed a diet with high phosphate and either high or normal magnesium content for 16 weeks. The primary outcome was the tissue calcium content of the aorta in the high versus normal dietary magnesium group. In addition, we analysed plasma mineral concentrations, aortic vascular calcification identified with von Kossa staining, calcium apposition time and aortic expression of genes related to vascular calcification. RESULTS: The number of animals in the highest tissue calcium content tertile was significantly lower in the abdominal aorta [1 (10%) versus 6 (55%); P = .03] in the high versus normal dietary magnesium group, but did not differ in the aortic arch and thoracic aorta. Von Kossa staining and calcium apposition time corresponded to these results. The median tissue calcium content was not significantly different between the groups. Serum phosphate concentrations and expression of osteogenic markers in the aorta did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that increased dietary magnesium inhibits abdominal vascular calcification in an experimental animal model of CKD in vivo. These are promising results for CKD patients and further study is needed to identify the mechanisms involved and to determine the clinical relevance in patients. SN - 1460-2385 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35134986/Dietary_magnesium_supplementation_inhibits_abdominal_vascular_calcification_in_an_experimental_animal_model_of_chronic_kidney_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -