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COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among different population groups in China: a national multicenter online survey.
BMC Infect Dis. 2022 Feb 14; 22(1):153.BI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

COVID-19 vaccine has been available in China since the beginning of the 2021, however, certain numbers of people are reluctant for some reasons to vaccinate. The high vaccine coverage is crucial for controlling disease transmission, however, the vaccine hesitancy might be a barrier to the establishment of sufficient herd immunization. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among different population groups, and explore common barriers and facilitators to vaccination decisions.

METHODS

The current survey was performed among Chinese students, public health professionals, medical workers and general population from January to March 2021 from seven cities in China. The questionnaire contained sociodemographic information, concerns about infection with COVID-19, general vaccination behaviors and attitudes, the General Vaccine Hesitancy Scale, the COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Scale and other potential factors. Univariate analysis was conducted by chi-squared test, and variables significant at P < 0.10 were then included in a multivariable regression model.

RESULTS

The prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy was 15.6% in our study, and 23.9% of students, 21.2% of the general population, 13.1% of medical workers, and 10.4% of public health professionals had vaccine hesitancy. The results of multivariate analysis indicated that participants who had received negative information of COVID-19 vaccine (OR: 1.563, 95% CI: 1.229-1.986) and who had doubts about the information source (OR: 2.157, 95% CI: 1.697-2.742) were more likely to have vaccine hesitancy. While those who needed transparent information about COVID-19 vaccine (OR: 0.722, 95% CI: 0.535-0.973) and who would get COVID-19 vaccine if doctors recommended (OR: 0.176, 95% CI: 0.132-0.234) were less likely to have COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy.

CONCLUSIONS

Given recommendations from medical workers about vaccination can motivate people to accept COVID-19 vaccination, appropriate training in knowledge about vaccines and communication skills are necessary for them to increase public's willingness of vaccination. Reducing the spread of misinformation and disseminating facts in a timely and accurate way will likely reduce vaccine hesitancy. Moreover, to establish suitable communication strategies and information exchange platforms between the government and the public and a warning system on infodemic would be helpful to improve public's confidence in vaccination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Population Medicine and Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.School of Population Medicine and Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. suxiaoyou@hotmail.com.School of Population Medicine and Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.School of Population Medicine and Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.School of Population Medicine and Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.School of Nursing, Jining Medical University, Jining, Shandong, China.Affiliated Tumor Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, China.Public Health School, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.Department of Clinical Research, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China.Henan Cancer Hospital, Affiliate Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, West China School of Public Health and West China Fourth Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China.School of Public Health, Department of Clinical Research, Baotou Medical College, Baotou, China.Department of Cancer Epidemiology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 17 South Panjiayuan, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35164700

Citation

Huang, Yiman, et al. "COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Among Different Population Groups in China: a National Multicenter Online Survey." BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 22, no. 1, 2022, p. 153.
Huang Y, Su X, Xiao W, et al. COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among different population groups in China: a national multicenter online survey. BMC Infect Dis. 2022;22(1):153.
Huang, Y., Su, X., Xiao, W., Wang, H., Si, M., Wang, W., Gu, X., Ma, L., Li, L., Zhang, S., Yang, C., Yu, Y., & Qiao, Y. (2022). COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among different population groups in China: a national multicenter online survey. BMC Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 153. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-022-07111-0
Huang Y, et al. COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Among Different Population Groups in China: a National Multicenter Online Survey. BMC Infect Dis. 2022 Feb 14;22(1):153. PubMed PMID: 35164700.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among different population groups in China: a national multicenter online survey. AU - Huang,Yiman, AU - Su,Xiaoyou, AU - Xiao,Weijun, AU - Wang,Hao, AU - Si,Mingyu, AU - Wang,Wenjun, AU - Gu,Xiaofen, AU - Ma,Li, AU - Li,Li, AU - Zhang,Shaokai, AU - Yang,Chunxia, AU - Yu,Yanqin, AU - Qiao,Youlin, Y1 - 2022/02/14/ PY - 2021/08/15/received PY - 2022/01/31/accepted PY - 2022/2/15/entrez PY - 2022/2/16/pubmed PY - 2022/2/17/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - China KW - Infodemic KW - Medical workers KW - Vaccine hesitancy SP - 153 EP - 153 JF - BMC infectious diseases JO - BMC Infect Dis VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: COVID-19 vaccine has been available in China since the beginning of the 2021, however, certain numbers of people are reluctant for some reasons to vaccinate. The high vaccine coverage is crucial for controlling disease transmission, however, the vaccine hesitancy might be a barrier to the establishment of sufficient herd immunization. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among different population groups, and explore common barriers and facilitators to vaccination decisions. METHODS: The current survey was performed among Chinese students, public health professionals, medical workers and general population from January to March 2021 from seven cities in China. The questionnaire contained sociodemographic information, concerns about infection with COVID-19, general vaccination behaviors and attitudes, the General Vaccine Hesitancy Scale, the COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Scale and other potential factors. Univariate analysis was conducted by chi-squared test, and variables significant at P < 0.10 were then included in a multivariable regression model. RESULTS: The prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy was 15.6% in our study, and 23.9% of students, 21.2% of the general population, 13.1% of medical workers, and 10.4% of public health professionals had vaccine hesitancy. The results of multivariate analysis indicated that participants who had received negative information of COVID-19 vaccine (OR: 1.563, 95% CI: 1.229-1.986) and who had doubts about the information source (OR: 2.157, 95% CI: 1.697-2.742) were more likely to have vaccine hesitancy. While those who needed transparent information about COVID-19 vaccine (OR: 0.722, 95% CI: 0.535-0.973) and who would get COVID-19 vaccine if doctors recommended (OR: 0.176, 95% CI: 0.132-0.234) were less likely to have COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. CONCLUSIONS: Given recommendations from medical workers about vaccination can motivate people to accept COVID-19 vaccination, appropriate training in knowledge about vaccines and communication skills are necessary for them to increase public's willingness of vaccination. Reducing the spread of misinformation and disseminating facts in a timely and accurate way will likely reduce vaccine hesitancy. Moreover, to establish suitable communication strategies and information exchange platforms between the government and the public and a warning system on infodemic would be helpful to improve public's confidence in vaccination. SN - 1471-2334 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35164700/COVID_19_vaccine_hesitancy_among_different_population_groups_in_China:_a_national_multicenter_online_survey_ L2 - https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-022-07111-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -