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Persistent hypercoagulability in dogs envenomated by the European adder (Vipera berus berus).
PLoS One. 2022; 17(2):e0263238.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Envenomation by the European adder, Vipera berus berus (Vbb), is a medical emergency. The overall in vivo haemostatic effects of pro- and anticoagulant components in Vbb venom, and the downstream effects of cellular injury and systemic inflammation, are unclear.

OBJECTIVES

To longitudinally describe the global coagulation status of dogs after Vbb envenomation and compare to healthy controls. A secondary aim was to investigate differences between dogs treated with and without antivenom.

METHODS

Citrated plasma was collected at presentation, 12 hours (h), 24 h, 36 h and 15 days after bite from 28 dogs envenomated by Vbb, and from 28 healthy controls at a single timepoint. Thrombin generation (initiated with and without exogenous phospholipids and tissue factor), thrombin-antithrombin (TAT)-complexes and the procoagulant activity of phosphatidylserine (PS)-expressing extracellular vesicles (EVs), expressed as PS-equivalents, were measured.

RESULTS

At presentation the envenomated dogs were hypercoagulable compared to controls, measured as increased thrombin generation, TAT-complexes and PS-equivalents. The hypercoagulability decreased gradually but compared to controls thrombin generation and PS-equivalents were still increased at day 15. The discrepancy in peak thrombin between envenomated dogs and controls was greater when the measurement was phospholipid-dependent, indicating that PS-positive EVs contribute to hypercoagulability. Lag time was shorter in non-antivenom treated dogs, compared to antivenom treated dogs <24 h after envenomation.

CONCLUSIONS

Hypercoagulability was measured in dogs up to 15 days after Vbb envenomation. Dogs treated with antivenom may be less hypercoagulable than their non-antivenom treated counterparts. Thrombin generation is a promising diagnostic and monitoring tool for Vbb envenomation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Oslo, Norway.Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. The Blood Cell Research Group, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Preclinical Sciences and Pathology, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Oslo, Norway.Norwegian Food Safety Authority, Brumunddal, Norway.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Oslo, Norway.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Oslo, Norway.Anicura Dyresykehus Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Anicura Jeløy Dyresykehus, Moss, Norway.Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. The Blood Cell Research Group, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35180240

Citation

Harjen, Hannah J., et al. "Persistent Hypercoagulability in Dogs Envenomated By the European Adder (Vipera Berus Berus)." PloS One, vol. 17, no. 2, 2022, pp. e0263238.
Harjen HJ, Hellum M, Rørtveit R, et al. Persistent hypercoagulability in dogs envenomated by the European adder (Vipera berus berus). PLoS One. 2022;17(2):e0263238.
Harjen, H. J., Hellum, M., Rørtveit, R., Oscarson, M., Anfinsen, K. P., Moldal, E. R., Solbak, S., Kanse, S. M., & Henriksson, C. E. (2022). Persistent hypercoagulability in dogs envenomated by the European adder (Vipera berus berus). PloS One, 17(2), e0263238. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0263238
Harjen HJ, et al. Persistent Hypercoagulability in Dogs Envenomated By the European Adder (Vipera Berus Berus). PLoS One. 2022;17(2):e0263238. PubMed PMID: 35180240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Persistent hypercoagulability in dogs envenomated by the European adder (Vipera berus berus). AU - Harjen,Hannah J, AU - Hellum,Marit, AU - Rørtveit,Runa, AU - Oscarson,Malin, AU - Anfinsen,Kristin P, AU - Moldal,Elena R, AU - Solbak,Susanna, AU - Kanse,Sandip M, AU - Henriksson,Carola E, Y1 - 2022/02/18/ PY - 2021/04/15/received PY - 2022/01/14/accepted PY - 2022/2/18/entrez PY - 2022/2/19/pubmed PY - 2022/2/19/medline SP - e0263238 EP - e0263238 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Envenomation by the European adder, Vipera berus berus (Vbb), is a medical emergency. The overall in vivo haemostatic effects of pro- and anticoagulant components in Vbb venom, and the downstream effects of cellular injury and systemic inflammation, are unclear. OBJECTIVES: To longitudinally describe the global coagulation status of dogs after Vbb envenomation and compare to healthy controls. A secondary aim was to investigate differences between dogs treated with and without antivenom. METHODS: Citrated plasma was collected at presentation, 12 hours (h), 24 h, 36 h and 15 days after bite from 28 dogs envenomated by Vbb, and from 28 healthy controls at a single timepoint. Thrombin generation (initiated with and without exogenous phospholipids and tissue factor), thrombin-antithrombin (TAT)-complexes and the procoagulant activity of phosphatidylserine (PS)-expressing extracellular vesicles (EVs), expressed as PS-equivalents, were measured. RESULTS: At presentation the envenomated dogs were hypercoagulable compared to controls, measured as increased thrombin generation, TAT-complexes and PS-equivalents. The hypercoagulability decreased gradually but compared to controls thrombin generation and PS-equivalents were still increased at day 15. The discrepancy in peak thrombin between envenomated dogs and controls was greater when the measurement was phospholipid-dependent, indicating that PS-positive EVs contribute to hypercoagulability. Lag time was shorter in non-antivenom treated dogs, compared to antivenom treated dogs <24 h after envenomation. CONCLUSIONS: Hypercoagulability was measured in dogs up to 15 days after Vbb envenomation. Dogs treated with antivenom may be less hypercoagulable than their non-antivenom treated counterparts. Thrombin generation is a promising diagnostic and monitoring tool for Vbb envenomation. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35180240/Persistent_hypercoagulability_in_dogs_envenomated_by_the_European_adder__Vipera_berus_berus__ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0263238 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -