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Associations Between Unprocessed Red Meat and Processed Meat With Risk of Recurrence and Mortality in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer.
JAMA Netw Open. 2022 02 01; 5(2):e220145.JN

Abstract

Importance

The American Cancer Society and American Institute for Cancer Research recommend that cancer survivors limit intake of red and processed meats. This recommendation is based on consistent associations between red and processed meat intake and cancer risk, particularly risk of colorectal cancer, but fewer data are available on red and processed meat intake after cancer diagnosis.

Objectives

To examine whether intake of unprocessed red meat or processed meat is associated with risk of cancer recurrence or mortality in patients with colon cancer.

Design, Setting, and Participants

This prospective cohort study used data from participants with stage III colon cancer enrolled in the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB 89803/Alliance) trial between 1999 and 2001. The clinical database for this analysis was frozen on November 9, 2009; the current data analyses were finalized in December 2021.

Exposures

Quartiles of unprocessed red meat and processed meat intake assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire during and 6 months after chemotherapy.

Main Outcomes and Measures

Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for risk of cancer recurrence or death and all-cause mortality.

Results

This study was conducted among 1011 patients with stage III colon cancer. The median (IQR) age at enrollment was 60 (51-69) years, 442 patients (44%) were women, and 899 patients (89%) were White. Over a median (IQR) follow-up period of 6.6 (1.9-7.5) years, we observed 305 deaths and 81 recurrences without death during follow-up (386 events combined). Intake of unprocessed red meat or processed meat after colon cancer diagnosis was not associated with risk of recurrence or mortality. The multivariable HRs comparing the highest vs lowest quartiles for cancer recurrence or death were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.58-1.23) for unprocessed red meat and 1.05 (95% CI, 0.75-1.47) for processed meat. For all-cause mortality, the corresponding HRs were 0.71 (95% CI, 0.47-1.07) for unprocessed red meat and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.72-1.51) for processed meat.

Conclusions and Relevance

In this cohort study, postdiagnosis intake of unprocessed red meat or processed meat was not associated with risk of recurrence or death among patients with stage III colon cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco. Department of Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco.Alliance Statistics and Data Management Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.Alliance Statistics and Data Management Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.Edward Hematology Oncology Group, Naperville, Illinois.Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.Virginia Oncology Associates, Norfolk.Southeast Clinical Oncology Research Consortium, Mission Hospitals, Inc, Asheville, North Carolina.University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois.Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco.Program in Molecular Pathology Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, Cambridge.University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35191970

Citation

Van Blarigan, Erin L., et al. "Associations Between Unprocessed Red Meat and Processed Meat With Risk of Recurrence and Mortality in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer." JAMA Network Open, vol. 5, no. 2, 2022, pp. e220145.
Van Blarigan EL, Ou FS, Bainter TM, et al. Associations Between Unprocessed Red Meat and Processed Meat With Risk of Recurrence and Mortality in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer. JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5(2):e220145.
Van Blarigan, E. L., Ou, F. S., Bainter, T. M., Fuchs, C. S., Niedzwiecki, D., Zhang, S., Saltz, L. B., Mayer, R. J., Hantel, A., Benson, A. B., Atienza, D., Messino, M., Kindler, H. L., Venook, A. P., Ogino, S., Sanoff, H. K., Giovannucci, E. L., Ng, K., & Meyerhardt, J. A. (2022). Associations Between Unprocessed Red Meat and Processed Meat With Risk of Recurrence and Mortality in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer. JAMA Network Open, 5(2), e220145. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.0145
Van Blarigan EL, et al. Associations Between Unprocessed Red Meat and Processed Meat With Risk of Recurrence and Mortality in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer. JAMA Netw Open. 2022 02 1;5(2):e220145. PubMed PMID: 35191970.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations Between Unprocessed Red Meat and Processed Meat With Risk of Recurrence and Mortality in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer. AU - Van Blarigan,Erin L, AU - Ou,Fang-Shu, AU - Bainter,Tiffany M, AU - Fuchs,Charles S, AU - Niedzwiecki,Donna, AU - Zhang,Sui, AU - Saltz,Leonard B, AU - Mayer,Robert J, AU - Hantel,Alexander, AU - Benson,Al B,3rd AU - Atienza,Daniel, AU - Messino,Michael, AU - Kindler,Hedy L, AU - Venook,Alan P, AU - Ogino,Shuji, AU - Sanoff,Hanna K, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Ng,Kimmie, AU - Meyerhardt,Jeffrey A, Y1 - 2022/02/01/ PY - 2022/2/22/entrez PY - 2022/2/23/pubmed PY - 2022/3/9/medline SP - e220145 EP - e220145 JF - JAMA network open JO - JAMA Netw Open VL - 5 IS - 2 N2 - Importance: The American Cancer Society and American Institute for Cancer Research recommend that cancer survivors limit intake of red and processed meats. This recommendation is based on consistent associations between red and processed meat intake and cancer risk, particularly risk of colorectal cancer, but fewer data are available on red and processed meat intake after cancer diagnosis. Objectives: To examine whether intake of unprocessed red meat or processed meat is associated with risk of cancer recurrence or mortality in patients with colon cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective cohort study used data from participants with stage III colon cancer enrolled in the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB 89803/Alliance) trial between 1999 and 2001. The clinical database for this analysis was frozen on November 9, 2009; the current data analyses were finalized in December 2021. Exposures: Quartiles of unprocessed red meat and processed meat intake assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire during and 6 months after chemotherapy. Main Outcomes and Measures: Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for risk of cancer recurrence or death and all-cause mortality. Results: This study was conducted among 1011 patients with stage III colon cancer. The median (IQR) age at enrollment was 60 (51-69) years, 442 patients (44%) were women, and 899 patients (89%) were White. Over a median (IQR) follow-up period of 6.6 (1.9-7.5) years, we observed 305 deaths and 81 recurrences without death during follow-up (386 events combined). Intake of unprocessed red meat or processed meat after colon cancer diagnosis was not associated with risk of recurrence or mortality. The multivariable HRs comparing the highest vs lowest quartiles for cancer recurrence or death were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.58-1.23) for unprocessed red meat and 1.05 (95% CI, 0.75-1.47) for processed meat. For all-cause mortality, the corresponding HRs were 0.71 (95% CI, 0.47-1.07) for unprocessed red meat and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.72-1.51) for processed meat. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, postdiagnosis intake of unprocessed red meat or processed meat was not associated with risk of recurrence or death among patients with stage III colon cancer. SN - 2574-3805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35191970/Associations_Between_Unprocessed_Red_Meat_and_Processed_Meat_With_Risk_of_Recurrence_and_Mortality_in_Patients_With_Stage_III_Colon_Cancer_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -