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The laboratory diagnosis of megaloblastic anemias.
West J Med. 1978 Apr; 128(4):294-304.WJ

Abstract

The diagnostic approach to megaloblastic anemia involves four usually sequential steps. The first step, recognition of megaloblastosis, requires attention to altered blood cell size and morphology. These changes may sometimes be subtle or masked. The cornerstone of the second step, identification of the specific vitamin deficiency, is assay of serum vitamin B(12) and folic acid levels, although they may occasionally be misleading. The third step, identification of the specific disease entity responsible for the vitamin deficiency, generally revolves around tests of absorption and gastric function. The fourth step, reevaluation after replacement therapy, is often not thought of as a diagnostic step but carries important diagnostic implications and is sometimes the only way in which coexisting abnormalities can be unmasked and identified.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

351964

Citation

Carmel, R. "The Laboratory Diagnosis of Megaloblastic Anemias." The Western Journal of Medicine, vol. 128, no. 4, 1978, pp. 294-304.
Carmel R. The laboratory diagnosis of megaloblastic anemias. West J Med. 1978;128(4):294-304.
Carmel, R. (1978). The laboratory diagnosis of megaloblastic anemias. The Western Journal of Medicine, 128(4), 294-304.
Carmel R. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Megaloblastic Anemias. West J Med. 1978;128(4):294-304. PubMed PMID: 351964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The laboratory diagnosis of megaloblastic anemias. A1 - Carmel,R, PY - 1978/4/1/pubmed PY - 1978/4/1/medline PY - 1978/4/1/entrez SP - 294 EP - 304 JF - The Western journal of medicine JO - West J Med VL - 128 IS - 4 N2 - The diagnostic approach to megaloblastic anemia involves four usually sequential steps. The first step, recognition of megaloblastosis, requires attention to altered blood cell size and morphology. These changes may sometimes be subtle or masked. The cornerstone of the second step, identification of the specific vitamin deficiency, is assay of serum vitamin B(12) and folic acid levels, although they may occasionally be misleading. The third step, identification of the specific disease entity responsible for the vitamin deficiency, generally revolves around tests of absorption and gastric function. The fourth step, reevaluation after replacement therapy, is often not thought of as a diagnostic step but carries important diagnostic implications and is sometimes the only way in which coexisting abnormalities can be unmasked and identified. SN - 0093-0415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/351964/The_laboratory_diagnosis_of_megaloblastic_anemias_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/351964/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -