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Sclerotherapy for bleeding esophageal varices after randomized trials.
West J Med. 1986 Oct; 145(4):481-4.WJ

Abstract

Endoscopic sclerotherapy remains an uncertain therapy for bleeding esophageal varices. Several recently reported randomized trials address the efficacy of immediate, long-term and prophylactic sclerotherapy. Analysis of these studies suggests that sclerotherapy may stop acute bleeding but has little impact on survival of an acute bleeding episode. Ongoing sclerosis reduces the incidence of rebleeding episodes and improves survival for those patients fortunate enough to survive the acute bleeding episode. Prophylactic therapy is an exciting concept limited by difficulty in identifying "high-risk" patients and by the high rate of complications associated with sclerotherapy.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3538660

Citation

Lieberman, D A.. "Sclerotherapy for Bleeding Esophageal Varices After Randomized Trials." The Western Journal of Medicine, vol. 145, no. 4, 1986, pp. 481-4.
Lieberman DA. Sclerotherapy for bleeding esophageal varices after randomized trials. West J Med. 1986;145(4):481-4.
Lieberman, D. A. (1986). Sclerotherapy for bleeding esophageal varices after randomized trials. The Western Journal of Medicine, 145(4), 481-4.
Lieberman DA. Sclerotherapy for Bleeding Esophageal Varices After Randomized Trials. West J Med. 1986;145(4):481-4. PubMed PMID: 3538660.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sclerotherapy for bleeding esophageal varices after randomized trials. A1 - Lieberman,D A, PY - 1986/10/1/pubmed PY - 1986/10/1/medline PY - 1986/10/1/entrez SP - 481 EP - 4 JF - The Western journal of medicine JO - West J Med VL - 145 IS - 4 N2 - Endoscopic sclerotherapy remains an uncertain therapy for bleeding esophageal varices. Several recently reported randomized trials address the efficacy of immediate, long-term and prophylactic sclerotherapy. Analysis of these studies suggests that sclerotherapy may stop acute bleeding but has little impact on survival of an acute bleeding episode. Ongoing sclerosis reduces the incidence of rebleeding episodes and improves survival for those patients fortunate enough to survive the acute bleeding episode. Prophylactic therapy is an exciting concept limited by difficulty in identifying "high-risk" patients and by the high rate of complications associated with sclerotherapy. SN - 0093-0415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3538660/Sclerotherapy_for_bleeding_esophageal_varices_after_randomized_trials_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/3538660/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -