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First live birth in China after cryopreserved ovarian tissue transplantation to prevent premature ovarian insufficiency.
Climacteric. 2022 08; 25(4):421-424.C

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This article reports the first live birth after cryopreserved ovarian tissue transplantation to prevent premature ovarian insufficiency in China.

METHODS

A patient with myelodysplastic syndrome received ovarian tissue cryopreservation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six ovarian cortex strips were thawed and transplanted into her peritoneal pocket 2 years later.

RESULTS

Pregnancy occurred spontaneously 27 months after grafting, and a healthy girl was born at 38 weeks gestation. Until now, the child has developed normally without any major diseases.

CONCLUSIONS

We report the first live birth resulting from ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation in China.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Oncology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Oncology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Oncology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Reproductive Medicine, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Obstetrics, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Ultrasound, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johanna Etienne Hospital of Neuss, Neuss, Germany.Ilabcomm GmbH, Augustin, Germany.UniCareD, University Cryobank for Assisted Reproductive Medicine and Fertility Protection at UniKiD, University Women's Hospital Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Beijing, China. University Women's Hospital and Research Centre for Women's Health, Department of Women's Health, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35504301

Citation

Ruan, X, et al. "First Live Birth in China After Cryopreserved Ovarian Tissue Transplantation to Prevent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency." Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, vol. 25, no. 4, 2022, pp. 421-424.
Ruan X, Du J, Lu D, et al. First live birth in China after cryopreserved ovarian tissue transplantation to prevent premature ovarian insufficiency. Climacteric. 2022;25(4):421-424.
Ruan, X., Du, J., Lu, D., Duan, W., Jin, F., Kong, W., Wu, Y., Dai, Y., Yan, S., Yin, C., Li, Y., Cheng, J., Jia, C., Liu, X., Wu, Q., Gu, M., Ju, R., Xu, X., Yang, Y., ... Mueck, A. O. (2022). First live birth in China after cryopreserved ovarian tissue transplantation to prevent premature ovarian insufficiency. Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, 25(4), 421-424. https://doi.org/10.1080/13697137.2022.2064215
Ruan X, et al. First Live Birth in China After Cryopreserved Ovarian Tissue Transplantation to Prevent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency. Climacteric. 2022;25(4):421-424. PubMed PMID: 35504301.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - First live birth in China after cryopreserved ovarian tissue transplantation to prevent premature ovarian insufficiency. AU - Ruan,X, AU - Du,J, AU - Lu,D, AU - Duan,W, AU - Jin,F, AU - Kong,W, AU - Wu,Y, AU - Dai,Y, AU - Yan,S, AU - Yin,C, AU - Li,Y, AU - Cheng,J, AU - Jia,C, AU - Liu,X, AU - Wu,Q, AU - Gu,M, AU - Ju,R, AU - Xu,X, AU - Yang,Y, AU - Jin,J, AU - Korell,M, AU - Montag,M, AU - Liebenthron,J, AU - Mueck,A O, Y1 - 2022/05/03/ PY - 2022/5/4/pubmed PY - 2022/7/12/medline PY - 2022/5/3/entrez KW - China KW - Ovarian tissue cryopreservation KW - first KW - live birth KW - premature ovarian insufficiency KW - transplantation SP - 421 EP - 424 JF - Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society JO - Climacteric VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This article reports the first live birth after cryopreserved ovarian tissue transplantation to prevent premature ovarian insufficiency in China. METHODS: A patient with myelodysplastic syndrome received ovarian tissue cryopreservation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six ovarian cortex strips were thawed and transplanted into her peritoneal pocket 2 years later. RESULTS: Pregnancy occurred spontaneously 27 months after grafting, and a healthy girl was born at 38 weeks gestation. Until now, the child has developed normally without any major diseases. CONCLUSIONS: We report the first live birth resulting from ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation in China. SN - 1473-0804 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35504301/First_live_birth_in_China_after_cryopreserved_ovarian_tissue_transplantation_to_prevent_premature_ovarian_insufficiency. DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -