Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Kawasaki disease in a 4-year-old boy.
Postgrad Med. 1987 Apr; 81(5):95-8, 101-2.PM

Abstract

A 4-year-old boy experienced sudden fever, followed by a rash on the trunk and extremities and erythema of the pharynx. Five days later, the fever remained and erythema appeared on the oropharynx, tongue, and lips. The skin of the palms and soles became erythematous and indurated, and both conjunctivae became injected. Desquamation of the skin occurred on both thumbs and one finger, and an anterior cervical lymph node was found to be enlarged. The patient was diagnosed as having Kawasaki disease, and treatment with aspirin was started. The desquamation progressed to involve the entire surface of the palms and soles, and then symptoms resolved. Twenty years after recognition of Kawasaki disease, this enigmatic illness continues to defy attempts to understand its etiology and pathogenesis. Most experts agree that the cause is either an environmental toxin or an infectious agent, but other possible causative agents may need to be proposed and investigated.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3562385

Citation

Haines, J D.. "Kawasaki Disease in a 4-year-old Boy." Postgraduate Medicine, vol. 81, no. 5, 1987, pp. 95-8, 101-2.
Haines JD. Kawasaki disease in a 4-year-old boy. Postgrad Med. 1987;81(5):95-8, 101-2.
Haines, J. D. (1987). Kawasaki disease in a 4-year-old boy. Postgraduate Medicine, 81(5), 95-8, 101-2.
Haines JD. Kawasaki Disease in a 4-year-old Boy. Postgrad Med. 1987;81(5):95-8, 101-2. PubMed PMID: 3562385.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Kawasaki disease in a 4-year-old boy. A1 - Haines,J D,Jr PY - 1987/4/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1987/4/1/entrez SP - 95-8, 101-2 JF - Postgraduate medicine JO - Postgrad Med VL - 81 IS - 5 N2 - A 4-year-old boy experienced sudden fever, followed by a rash on the trunk and extremities and erythema of the pharynx. Five days later, the fever remained and erythema appeared on the oropharynx, tongue, and lips. The skin of the palms and soles became erythematous and indurated, and both conjunctivae became injected. Desquamation of the skin occurred on both thumbs and one finger, and an anterior cervical lymph node was found to be enlarged. The patient was diagnosed as having Kawasaki disease, and treatment with aspirin was started. The desquamation progressed to involve the entire surface of the palms and soles, and then symptoms resolved. Twenty years after recognition of Kawasaki disease, this enigmatic illness continues to defy attempts to understand its etiology and pathogenesis. Most experts agree that the cause is either an environmental toxin or an infectious agent, but other possible causative agents may need to be proposed and investigated. SN - 0032-5481 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3562385/Kawasaki_disease_in_a_4_year_old_boy_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00325481.1987.11699784 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.