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Gardnerella vaginalis clades in pregnancy: New insights into the interactions with the vaginal microbiome.
PLoS One. 2022; 17(6):e0269590.Plos

Abstract

Gardnerella vaginalis (GV) is an anaerobic bacterial species involved in the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition of vaginal dysbiosis associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. GV strains are categorized into four clades, characterized by a different ability to produce virulence factors, such as sialidase. We investigated the distribution of GV clades and sialidase genes in the vaginal ecosystem of a cohort of pregnant women, assessing the correlations between GV clades and the whole vaginal microbiome. A total of 61 Caucasian pregnant women were enrolled. Their vaginal swabs, collected both at the first and third trimester of pregnancy, were used for (i) evaluation of the vaginal status by Nugent score, (ii) vaginal microbiome profiling by 16S rRNA sequencing, (iii) detection and quantification of GV clades and sialidase A gene by qPCR assays. DNA of at least one GV clade was detected in most vaginal swabs, with clade 4 being the most common one. GV clade 2, together with the presence of multiple clades (>2 simultaneously), were significantly associated with a BV condition. Significantly higher GV loads and sialidase gene levels were found in BV cases, compared to the healthy status. Clade 2 was related to the major shifts in the vaginal microbial composition, with a decrease in Lactobacillus and an increase in several BV-related taxa. As the number of GV clades detected simultaneously increased, a group of BV-associated bacteria tended to increase as well, while Bifidobacterium tended to decrease. A negative correlation between sialidase gene levels and Lactobacillus, and a positive correlation with Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Megasphaera, and Sneathia were observed. Our results added knowledge about the interactions of GV clades with the inhabitants of the vaginal microbiome, possibly helping to predict the severity of BV and opening new perspectives for the prevention of pregnancy-related complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Biomedical Technologies - National Research Council, Segrate, Milan, Italy.Microbiology, DIMES, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.Institute of Biomedical Technologies - National Research Council, Segrate, Milan, Italy.Institute of Biomedical Technologies - National Research Council, Segrate, Milan, Italy.Microbiology, DIMES, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.Family Advisory Health Centres, Ravenna, Italy.Family Advisory Health Centres, Ravenna, Italy.Unit of Microbiology, Greater Romagna Hub Laboratory, Pievesestina di Cesena, Italy.Microbiology, DIMES, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. Unit of Microbiology, Greater Romagna Hub Laboratory, Pievesestina di Cesena, Italy.Microbiology, DIMES, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.Institute of Biomedical Technologies - National Research Council, Segrate, Milan, Italy.Microbiology, DIMES, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35700195

Citation

Severgnini, Marco, et al. "Gardnerella Vaginalis Clades in Pregnancy: New Insights Into the Interactions With the Vaginal Microbiome." PloS One, vol. 17, no. 6, 2022, pp. e0269590.
Severgnini M, Morselli S, Camboni T, et al. Gardnerella vaginalis clades in pregnancy: New insights into the interactions with the vaginal microbiome. PLoS One. 2022;17(6):e0269590.
Severgnini, M., Morselli, S., Camboni, T., Ceccarani, C., Salvo, M., Zagonari, S., Patuelli, G., Pedna, M. F., Sambri, V., Foschi, C., Consolandi, C., & Marangoni, A. (2022). Gardnerella vaginalis clades in pregnancy: New insights into the interactions with the vaginal microbiome. PloS One, 17(6), e0269590. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0269590
Severgnini M, et al. Gardnerella Vaginalis Clades in Pregnancy: New Insights Into the Interactions With the Vaginal Microbiome. PLoS One. 2022;17(6):e0269590. PubMed PMID: 35700195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gardnerella vaginalis clades in pregnancy: New insights into the interactions with the vaginal microbiome. AU - Severgnini,Marco, AU - Morselli,Sara, AU - Camboni,Tania, AU - Ceccarani,Camilla, AU - Salvo,Melissa, AU - Zagonari,Sara, AU - Patuelli,Giulia, AU - Pedna,Maria Federica, AU - Sambri,Vittorio, AU - Foschi,Claudio, AU - Consolandi,Clarissa, AU - Marangoni,Antonella, Y1 - 2022/06/14/ PY - 2022/3/15/received PY - 2022/5/25/accepted PY - 2022/6/14/entrez PY - 2022/6/15/pubmed PY - 2022/6/18/medline SP - e0269590 EP - e0269590 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 17 IS - 6 N2 - Gardnerella vaginalis (GV) is an anaerobic bacterial species involved in the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition of vaginal dysbiosis associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. GV strains are categorized into four clades, characterized by a different ability to produce virulence factors, such as sialidase. We investigated the distribution of GV clades and sialidase genes in the vaginal ecosystem of a cohort of pregnant women, assessing the correlations between GV clades and the whole vaginal microbiome. A total of 61 Caucasian pregnant women were enrolled. Their vaginal swabs, collected both at the first and third trimester of pregnancy, were used for (i) evaluation of the vaginal status by Nugent score, (ii) vaginal microbiome profiling by 16S rRNA sequencing, (iii) detection and quantification of GV clades and sialidase A gene by qPCR assays. DNA of at least one GV clade was detected in most vaginal swabs, with clade 4 being the most common one. GV clade 2, together with the presence of multiple clades (>2 simultaneously), were significantly associated with a BV condition. Significantly higher GV loads and sialidase gene levels were found in BV cases, compared to the healthy status. Clade 2 was related to the major shifts in the vaginal microbial composition, with a decrease in Lactobacillus and an increase in several BV-related taxa. As the number of GV clades detected simultaneously increased, a group of BV-associated bacteria tended to increase as well, while Bifidobacterium tended to decrease. A negative correlation between sialidase gene levels and Lactobacillus, and a positive correlation with Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Megasphaera, and Sneathia were observed. Our results added knowledge about the interactions of GV clades with the inhabitants of the vaginal microbiome, possibly helping to predict the severity of BV and opening new perspectives for the prevention of pregnancy-related complications. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35700195/Gardnerella_vaginalis_clades_in_pregnancy:_New_insights_into_the_interactions_with_the_vaginal_microbiome. DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -