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Transmission of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus by Spissistilus festinus [Say, 1830] (Hemiptera: Membracidae) between Free-Living Vines and Vitis vinifera 'Cabernet Franc'.
Viruses. 2022 05 26; 14(6)V

Abstract

Grapevine red blotch disease emerged within the past decade, disrupting North American vine stock production and vineyard profitability. Our understanding of how grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV), the causal agent of the disease, interacts with its Vitis hosts and insect vector, Spissistilus festinus, is limited. Here, we studied the capabilities of S. festinus to transmit GRBV from and to free-living vines, identified as first-generation hybrids of V. californica and V. vinifera 'Sauvignon blanc' (Vcal hybrids), and to and from V. vinifera 'Cabernet franc' (Vvin Cf) vines. The transmission rate of GRBV was high from infected Vcal hybrid vines to healthy Vcal hybrid vines (77%, 10 of 13) and from infected Vvin Cf vines to healthy Vcal hybrid vines (100%, 3 of 3). In contrast, the transmission rate of GRBV was low from infected Vcal hybrid vines to healthy Vvin Cf vines (15%, 2 of 13), and from infected Vvin Cf vines to healthy Vvin Cf vines (19%, 5 of 27). No association was found between transmission rates and GRBV titer in donor vines used in transmission assays, but the virus titer was higher in the recipient leaves of Vcal hybrid vines compared with recipient leaves of Vvin Cf vines. The transmission of GRBV from infected Vcal hybrid vines was also determined to be trans-stadial. Altogether, our findings revealed that free-living vines can be a source for the GRBV inoculum that is transmissible by S. festinus to other free-living vines and a wine grape cultivar, illustrating the interconnected roles of the two virus hosts in riparian areas and commercial vineyards, respectively, for virus spread. These new insights into red blotch disease epidemiology will inform the implementation of disease management strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456, USA.School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456, USA.School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456, USA.Plant and Environmental Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA.School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456, USA.School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.Department of Plant Pathology, Foundation Plant Services, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.Department of Plant Pathology, Foundation Plant Services, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456, USA.School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35746628

Citation

Hoyle, Victoria, et al. "Transmission of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus By Spissistilus Festinus [Say, 1830] (Hemiptera: Membracidae) Between Free-Living Vines and Vitis Vinifera 'Cabernet Franc'." Viruses, vol. 14, no. 6, 2022.
Hoyle V, Flasco MT, Choi J, et al. Transmission of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus by Spissistilus festinus [Say, 1830] (Hemiptera: Membracidae) between Free-Living Vines and Vitis vinifera 'Cabernet Franc'. Viruses. 2022;14(6).
Hoyle, V., Flasco, M. T., Choi, J., Cieniewicz, E. J., McLane, H., Perry, K., Dangl, G., Rwahnih, M. A., Heck, M., Loeb, G., & Fuchs, M. F. (2022). Transmission of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus by Spissistilus festinus [Say, 1830] (Hemiptera: Membracidae) between Free-Living Vines and Vitis vinifera 'Cabernet Franc'. Viruses, 14(6). https://doi.org/10.3390/v14061156
Hoyle V, et al. Transmission of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus By Spissistilus Festinus [Say, 1830] (Hemiptera: Membracidae) Between Free-Living Vines and Vitis Vinifera 'Cabernet Franc'. Viruses. 2022 05 26;14(6) PubMed PMID: 35746628.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transmission of Grapevine Red Blotch Virus by Spissistilus festinus [Say, 1830] (Hemiptera: Membracidae) between Free-Living Vines and Vitis vinifera 'Cabernet Franc'. AU - Hoyle,Victoria, AU - Flasco,Madison T, AU - Choi,Jiyeong, AU - Cieniewicz,Elizabeth J, AU - McLane,Heather, AU - Perry,Keith, AU - Dangl,Gerald, AU - Rwahnih,Maher Al, AU - Heck,Michelle, AU - Loeb,Greg, AU - Fuchs,Marc F, Y1 - 2022/05/26/ PY - 2022/05/09/received PY - 2022/05/20/revised PY - 2022/05/23/accepted PY - 2022/6/24/entrez PY - 2022/6/25/pubmed PY - 2022/6/28/medline KW - Geminiviridae KW - Grablovirus KW - Spissistilus festinus KW - Vitis californica KW - Vitis vinifera JF - Viruses JO - Viruses VL - 14 IS - 6 N2 - Grapevine red blotch disease emerged within the past decade, disrupting North American vine stock production and vineyard profitability. Our understanding of how grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV), the causal agent of the disease, interacts with its Vitis hosts and insect vector, Spissistilus festinus, is limited. Here, we studied the capabilities of S. festinus to transmit GRBV from and to free-living vines, identified as first-generation hybrids of V. californica and V. vinifera 'Sauvignon blanc' (Vcal hybrids), and to and from V. vinifera 'Cabernet franc' (Vvin Cf) vines. The transmission rate of GRBV was high from infected Vcal hybrid vines to healthy Vcal hybrid vines (77%, 10 of 13) and from infected Vvin Cf vines to healthy Vcal hybrid vines (100%, 3 of 3). In contrast, the transmission rate of GRBV was low from infected Vcal hybrid vines to healthy Vvin Cf vines (15%, 2 of 13), and from infected Vvin Cf vines to healthy Vvin Cf vines (19%, 5 of 27). No association was found between transmission rates and GRBV titer in donor vines used in transmission assays, but the virus titer was higher in the recipient leaves of Vcal hybrid vines compared with recipient leaves of Vvin Cf vines. The transmission of GRBV from infected Vcal hybrid vines was also determined to be trans-stadial. Altogether, our findings revealed that free-living vines can be a source for the GRBV inoculum that is transmissible by S. festinus to other free-living vines and a wine grape cultivar, illustrating the interconnected roles of the two virus hosts in riparian areas and commercial vineyards, respectively, for virus spread. These new insights into red blotch disease epidemiology will inform the implementation of disease management strategies. SN - 1999-4915 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35746628/Transmission_of_Grapevine_Red_Blotch_Virus_by_Spissistilus_festinus_[Say_1830]__Hemiptera:_Membracidae__between_Free_Living_Vines_and_Vitis_vinifera_'Cabernet_Franc'_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -