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Association between dietary patterns and bacterial vaginosis: a case-control study.
Sci Rep. 2022 07 16; 12(1):12199.SR

Abstract

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a predominant vaginal disturbance that affects about 25% of childbearing-aged women. Dietary consumption may have a crucial role in vaginal flora imbalances. This study was a hospital-based case-control study. In total, 144 incident BV cases and 151 healthy participants were recruited from the gynecology clinic in Tehran, Iran, between November 2020 and June 2021. Participants' typical diets were collected by a food frequency questionnaire. Vaginal flora was characterized based on the Amsel criteria. Factor analysis was used to pinpoint the principal dietary patterns. For logistic regression, the first tertile was assumed as a reference. Five principal dietary patterns emerged and were nominated as "Healthy diet," "Unhealthy diet," "Ovo-vegetarian diet," "Pseudo-Mediterranean diet," and "Western diet." The "Unhealthy diet" pattern were positively associated with BV (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41, 7.94; ptrend: 0.006), while adherence to the "Ovo-vegetarian diet" pattern was associated with a reduced odds of BV (aOR = 0.16; 95% CI 0.07, 0.34; ptrend < 0.001). These results provide evidence that following the "unhealthy diet" pattern may lead to developing BV, and plant-based eating patterns may be associated with reduced BV odds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cellular and Molecular Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, No 7, Hafezi St., Farahzadi Blvd., P.O.Box: 19395-4741, Tehran, 1981619573, Iran.Department of Cellular and Molecular Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, No 7, Hafezi St., Farahzadi Blvd., P.O.Box: 19395-4741, Tehran, 1981619573, Iran. gh.eslamian@sbmu.ac.ir.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Community Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35842517

Citation

Noormohammadi, Morvarid, et al. "Association Between Dietary Patterns and Bacterial Vaginosis: a Case-control Study." Scientific Reports, vol. 12, no. 1, 2022, p. 12199.
Noormohammadi M, Eslamian G, Kazemi SN, et al. Association between dietary patterns and bacterial vaginosis: a case-control study. Sci Rep. 2022;12(1):12199.
Noormohammadi, M., Eslamian, G., Kazemi, S. N., & Rashidkhani, B. (2022). Association between dietary patterns and bacterial vaginosis: a case-control study. Scientific Reports, 12(1), 12199. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-16505-8
Noormohammadi M, et al. Association Between Dietary Patterns and Bacterial Vaginosis: a Case-control Study. Sci Rep. 2022 07 16;12(1):12199. PubMed PMID: 35842517.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between dietary patterns and bacterial vaginosis: a case-control study. AU - Noormohammadi,Morvarid, AU - Eslamian,Ghazaleh, AU - Kazemi,Seyyedeh Neda, AU - Rashidkhani,Bahram, Y1 - 2022/07/16/ PY - 2022/03/05/received PY - 2022/07/11/accepted PY - 2022/7/16/entrez PY - 2022/7/17/pubmed PY - 2022/7/20/medline SP - 12199 EP - 12199 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a predominant vaginal disturbance that affects about 25% of childbearing-aged women. Dietary consumption may have a crucial role in vaginal flora imbalances. This study was a hospital-based case-control study. In total, 144 incident BV cases and 151 healthy participants were recruited from the gynecology clinic in Tehran, Iran, between November 2020 and June 2021. Participants' typical diets were collected by a food frequency questionnaire. Vaginal flora was characterized based on the Amsel criteria. Factor analysis was used to pinpoint the principal dietary patterns. For logistic regression, the first tertile was assumed as a reference. Five principal dietary patterns emerged and were nominated as "Healthy diet," "Unhealthy diet," "Ovo-vegetarian diet," "Pseudo-Mediterranean diet," and "Western diet." The "Unhealthy diet" pattern were positively associated with BV (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41, 7.94; ptrend: 0.006), while adherence to the "Ovo-vegetarian diet" pattern was associated with a reduced odds of BV (aOR = 0.16; 95% CI 0.07, 0.34; ptrend < 0.001). These results provide evidence that following the "unhealthy diet" pattern may lead to developing BV, and plant-based eating patterns may be associated with reduced BV odds. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35842517/Association_between_dietary_patterns_and_bacterial_vaginosis:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-16505-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -