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Change in willingness to COVID-19 vaccination in China: Two online surveys during the pandemic.
J Med Virol. 2022 11; 94(11):5271-5278.JM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

As the variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue to emerge, periodic vaccine booster immunization may become a normal policy. This study investigated the changes and factors associated with vaccination intentions in various epidemic situations, which can provide suggestions for the construction and modification of routine vaccination program strategies.

METHODS

Two cross-sectional online surveys were conducted in January and June of 2021. The willingness and confidence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination were measured following propensity score matching (PSM) treatment. The difference in the willingness for COVID-19 Vaccination in the two surveys was analyzed by single or multi-factor analyses.

RESULTS

The willingness to accept the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine was higher in the second survey than that in the first survey (90.5% vs. 66.6%, p < 0.001). Concerns about the vaccine's safety declined (71.0% vs. 47.6%, p < 0.001), but concerns about the efficacy increased (22.4% vs. 30.9%, p < 0.001). Confidence in the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine had an important impact on the increased uptake willingness (odds ratio = 3.19, 95% confidence interval: 2.23-4.58, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

There has been a significant increase in attitudes towards the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine which was associated with higher vaccine confidence. Vaccine effectiveness received more concerns from respondents rather than safety after nearly 6 months' utilization of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. It indicates that aggressive communication and timely disclosure of vaccine data can build vaccine confidence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China. Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China. Global Center for Infectious Disease and Policy Research & Global Health and Infectious Diseases Group, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Global Center for Infectious Disease and Policy Research & Global Health and Infectious Diseases Group, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Global Center for Infectious Disease and Policy Research & Global Health and Infectious Diseases Group, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Global Center for Infectious Disease and Policy Research & Global Health and Infectious Diseases Group, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China. Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China. Global Center for Infectious Disease and Policy Research & Global Health and Infectious Diseases Group, Peking University, Beijing, China. Department of Global Health, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Laboratorial Science and Technology & Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China. Vaccine Research Center, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China. Global Center for Infectious Disease and Policy Research & Global Health and Infectious Diseases Group, Peking University, Beijing, China. Department of Global Health, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

35848516

Citation

Huang, Ninghua, et al. "Change in Willingness to COVID-19 Vaccination in China: Two Online Surveys During the Pandemic." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 94, no. 11, 2022, pp. 5271-5278.
Huang N, Wang C, Han B, et al. Change in willingness to COVID-19 vaccination in China: Two online surveys during the pandemic. J Med Virol. 2022;94(11):5271-5278.
Huang, N., Wang, C., Han, B., Zhao, T., Liu, B., Chen, L., Xie, M., Zheng, H., Zhang, S., Wang, Y., Juan, D., Liu, Y., Lu, Q., & Cui, F. (2022). Change in willingness to COVID-19 vaccination in China: Two online surveys during the pandemic. Journal of Medical Virology, 94(11), 5271-5278. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.28004
Huang N, et al. Change in Willingness to COVID-19 Vaccination in China: Two Online Surveys During the Pandemic. J Med Virol. 2022;94(11):5271-5278. PubMed PMID: 35848516.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Change in willingness to COVID-19 vaccination in China: Two online surveys during the pandemic. AU - Huang,Ninghua, AU - Wang,Chao, AU - Han,Bingfeng, AU - Zhao,Tianshuo, AU - Liu,Bei, AU - Chen,Linyi, AU - Xie,Mingzhu, AU - Zheng,Hui, AU - Zhang,Sihui, AU - Wang,Yu, AU - Juan,Du, AU - Liu,YaQiong, AU - Lu,QingBin, AU - Cui,Fuqiang, Y1 - 2022/07/23/ PY - 2022/07/11/revised PY - 2022/05/02/received PY - 2022/07/11/accepted PY - 2022/7/19/pubmed PY - 2022/9/15/medline PY - 2022/7/18/entrez KW - SARS-CoV-2 vaccine KW - propensity score matching KW - vaccine acceptance KW - vaccine confidence KW - vaccine willingness SP - 5271 EP - 5278 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J Med Virol VL - 94 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: As the variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue to emerge, periodic vaccine booster immunization may become a normal policy. This study investigated the changes and factors associated with vaccination intentions in various epidemic situations, which can provide suggestions for the construction and modification of routine vaccination program strategies. METHODS: Two cross-sectional online surveys were conducted in January and June of 2021. The willingness and confidence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination were measured following propensity score matching (PSM) treatment. The difference in the willingness for COVID-19 Vaccination in the two surveys was analyzed by single or multi-factor analyses. RESULTS: The willingness to accept the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine was higher in the second survey than that in the first survey (90.5% vs. 66.6%, p < 0.001). Concerns about the vaccine's safety declined (71.0% vs. 47.6%, p < 0.001), but concerns about the efficacy increased (22.4% vs. 30.9%, p < 0.001). Confidence in the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine had an important impact on the increased uptake willingness (odds ratio = 3.19, 95% confidence interval: 2.23-4.58, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: There has been a significant increase in attitudes towards the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine which was associated with higher vaccine confidence. Vaccine effectiveness received more concerns from respondents rather than safety after nearly 6 months' utilization of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. It indicates that aggressive communication and timely disclosure of vaccine data can build vaccine confidence. SN - 1096-9071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/35848516/Change_in_willingness_to_COVID_19_vaccination_in_China:_Two_online_surveys_during_the_pandemic_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -