Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Exploring the Willingness of the COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots in China Using the Health Belief Model: Web-Based Online Cross-Sectional Study.
Vaccines (Basel). 2022 Aug 17; 10(8)V

Abstract

(1) Objective: To explore Chinese residents' willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccine booster shots and identify predictors of the level of willingness based on the health belief model (HBM). (2) Methods: The snowball sampling method was used to distribute online questionnaires. A chi-square test was used to analyze the relationship between different variables. The causal relationship between HBM-related factors and booster vaccination intentions was explored by Structural equation modeling (SEM). (3) Results: A total of 898 complete responses were included; 64.3% had already received the booster injection. Most respondents intended to vaccinate themselves, while 16.1% were hesitant. Nearly half of the respondents chose to take the booster injection to support China's vaccination policy. Using the SEM, perceived susceptibility and perceived barriers were found to have a negative effect on booster vaccination intentions, whereas perceived benefit and cues to action positively affected booster vaccination intentions in the HBM. (4) Conclusions: Factors included in this study have different effects on the willingness to take the COVID-19 booster injections. Sociodemographic characteristics and characteristics of participants' COVID-19 vaccination have a significant effect on the willingness to receive vaccine booster shots. The HBM constructs can serve as good predictors of the acceptance of vaccine booster shots with the exception of perceived severity, which may benefit health officials in terms of conducting targeted strategies in vaccine programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China. Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.Shenzhen Health Development Research and Data Management Center, Shenzhen 518028, China.Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China. School of Medical Information Engineering, Jining Medical University, Rizhao 276826, China.Department of Biomedical Information, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

36016224

Citation

Hu, Dehua, et al. "Exploring the Willingness of the COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots in China Using the Health Belief Model: Web-Based Online Cross-Sectional Study." Vaccines, vol. 10, no. 8, 2022.
Hu D, Liu Z, Gong L, et al. Exploring the Willingness of the COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots in China Using the Health Belief Model: Web-Based Online Cross-Sectional Study. Vaccines (Basel). 2022;10(8).
Hu, D., Liu, Z., Gong, L., Kong, Y., Liu, H., Wei, C., Wu, X., Zhu, Q., & Guo, Y. (2022). Exploring the Willingness of the COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots in China Using the Health Belief Model: Web-Based Online Cross-Sectional Study. Vaccines, 10(8). https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10081336
Hu D, et al. Exploring the Willingness of the COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots in China Using the Health Belief Model: Web-Based Online Cross-Sectional Study. Vaccines (Basel). 2022 Aug 17;10(8) PubMed PMID: 36016224.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exploring the Willingness of the COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots in China Using the Health Belief Model: Web-Based Online Cross-Sectional Study. AU - Hu,Dehua, AU - Liu,Zhisheng, AU - Gong,Liyue, AU - Kong,Yi, AU - Liu,Hao, AU - Wei,Caiping, AU - Wu,Xusheng, AU - Zhu,Qizhen, AU - Guo,Yi, Y1 - 2022/08/17/ PY - 2022/07/11/received PY - 2022/08/14/revised PY - 2022/08/15/accepted PY - 2022/8/26/entrez PY - 2022/8/27/pubmed PY - 2022/8/27/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - booster vaccination KW - health belief model KW - influencing factor KW - structural equation model KW - vaccination willingness JF - Vaccines JO - Vaccines (Basel) VL - 10 IS - 8 N2 - (1) Objective: To explore Chinese residents' willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccine booster shots and identify predictors of the level of willingness based on the health belief model (HBM). (2) Methods: The snowball sampling method was used to distribute online questionnaires. A chi-square test was used to analyze the relationship between different variables. The causal relationship between HBM-related factors and booster vaccination intentions was explored by Structural equation modeling (SEM). (3) Results: A total of 898 complete responses were included; 64.3% had already received the booster injection. Most respondents intended to vaccinate themselves, while 16.1% were hesitant. Nearly half of the respondents chose to take the booster injection to support China's vaccination policy. Using the SEM, perceived susceptibility and perceived barriers were found to have a negative effect on booster vaccination intentions, whereas perceived benefit and cues to action positively affected booster vaccination intentions in the HBM. (4) Conclusions: Factors included in this study have different effects on the willingness to take the COVID-19 booster injections. Sociodemographic characteristics and characteristics of participants' COVID-19 vaccination have a significant effect on the willingness to receive vaccine booster shots. The HBM constructs can serve as good predictors of the acceptance of vaccine booster shots with the exception of perceived severity, which may benefit health officials in terms of conducting targeted strategies in vaccine programs. SN - 2076-393X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/36016224/Exploring_the_Willingness_of_the_COVID_19_Vaccine_Booster_Shots_in_China_Using_the_Health_Belief_Model:_Web_Based_Online_Cross_Sectional_Study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.