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Susceptibility of inbred Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to lethal disease by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.
Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1987 Jul; 185(3):250-61.PS

Abstract

An acutely lethal LCMV disease model has been established in the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) in which lethality and disease are dependent upon both the inbred hamster strain and the LCMV strain. Young adult inbred, male and female, hamsters were tested for lethal-disease susceptibility by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strains, WE or Armstrong (ARM). With WE inocula, PD4 and MHA inbred hamsters were highly susceptible to a wasting disease. LVG and LHC inbred hamsters were intermediate in susceptibility; some of these animals died of wasting illness, and others exhibited minimal disease and survived. CB and LSH hamsters were highly resistant to any disease by WE. Mean survival times of susceptible hamsters given lethal WE inocula approximated 2.5 weeks and were not dependent on virus dose. By 1.5 weeks after WE inoculation wasting disease signs were notable and consisted of lethargy, progressive body weight loss, and diarrhea. The LCMV strain, ARM, was avirulent for all hamster strains, causing neither death nor disease. Hamsters surviving WE or ARM inoculation appeared healthy, produced LCMV antibody, and acquired resistance to further lethal WE challenge. Despite hamster-lethality differences. WE and ARM appeared comparably immunogenic for all hamster strains, based on host antibody titers. A number of other differences between the LCMV strains were, however, noted which could be relevant to virus virulence and lethality for hamster hosts. These included guinea pig lethality, temperature sensitivity, and plaque morphology.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3601946

Citation

Genovesi, E V., and C J. Peters. "Susceptibility of Inbred Syrian Golden Hamsters (Mesocricetus Auratus) to Lethal Disease By Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus." Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N.Y.), vol. 185, no. 3, 1987, pp. 250-61.
Genovesi EV, Peters CJ. Susceptibility of inbred Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to lethal disease by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1987;185(3):250-61.
Genovesi, E. V., & Peters, C. J. (1987). Susceptibility of inbred Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to lethal disease by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N.Y.), 185(3), 250-61.
Genovesi EV, Peters CJ. Susceptibility of Inbred Syrian Golden Hamsters (Mesocricetus Auratus) to Lethal Disease By Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1987;185(3):250-61. PubMed PMID: 3601946.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Susceptibility of inbred Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to lethal disease by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. AU - Genovesi,E V, AU - Peters,C J, PY - 1987/7/1/pubmed PY - 1987/7/1/medline PY - 1987/7/1/entrez SP - 250 EP - 61 JF - Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N.Y.) JO - Proc Soc Exp Biol Med VL - 185 IS - 3 N2 - An acutely lethal LCMV disease model has been established in the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) in which lethality and disease are dependent upon both the inbred hamster strain and the LCMV strain. Young adult inbred, male and female, hamsters were tested for lethal-disease susceptibility by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strains, WE or Armstrong (ARM). With WE inocula, PD4 and MHA inbred hamsters were highly susceptible to a wasting disease. LVG and LHC inbred hamsters were intermediate in susceptibility; some of these animals died of wasting illness, and others exhibited minimal disease and survived. CB and LSH hamsters were highly resistant to any disease by WE. Mean survival times of susceptible hamsters given lethal WE inocula approximated 2.5 weeks and were not dependent on virus dose. By 1.5 weeks after WE inoculation wasting disease signs were notable and consisted of lethargy, progressive body weight loss, and diarrhea. The LCMV strain, ARM, was avirulent for all hamster strains, causing neither death nor disease. Hamsters surviving WE or ARM inoculation appeared healthy, produced LCMV antibody, and acquired resistance to further lethal WE challenge. Despite hamster-lethality differences. WE and ARM appeared comparably immunogenic for all hamster strains, based on host antibody titers. A number of other differences between the LCMV strains were, however, noted which could be relevant to virus virulence and lethality for hamster hosts. These included guinea pig lethality, temperature sensitivity, and plaque morphology. SN - 0037-9727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3601946/Susceptibility_of_inbred_Syrian_golden_hamsters__Mesocricetus_auratus__to_lethal_disease_by_lymphocytic_choriomeningitis_virus_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=3601946.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -