Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Does the mineral content of tap water correlate with urinary calculus composition?
Urolithiasis. 2022 Dec; 50(6):691-699.U

Abstract

The association between the mineral content of drinking water and urolithiasis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the mineral composition of tap water correlates with urinary calculus composition. Patients with calculi that underwent biochemical analysis at two urological centres in the North-West of England between November 2015 and December 2020 were included. Calculus composition was reviewed with respect to patient demographics, serum biochemical variables, and water mineral composition data obtained from the local water supply company using patient postcodes. 1711 urinary tract calculi from 1518 patients, living in 87 water supply zones were included. Water sodium concentration was an independent predictor of mixed calcium oxalate/uric acid calculi (OR 1.157, p < 0.001) and a negative independent predictor of calcium oxalate monohydrate (OR 0.896, p = 0.001) and dihydrate (OR 0.742, p = 0.034) calculi. Moreover, the magnesium-to-calcium ratio of tap water was a negative independent predictor of calcium oxalate monohydrate calculi (OR < 0.001, p = < 0.001), while tap water magnesium concentration inversely correlated with the percentage of calcium oxalate within calculi (rs = - 0.054, p = 0.026). Total water hardness did not independently predict calculus type. Many factors are implicated in the formation of urinary calculi. This study is the first to assess calculus composition in relation to tap water mineral content using postcode data on a case-by-case basis. Though total water hardness did not independently predict calculus composition, the interesting findings relating to water sodium and magnesium concentrations are in need of closer scrutiny in larger scale studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Rochdale Infirmary, Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, Whitehall Street, Rochdale, Greater Manchester, OL12 0NB, UK. kirolosmichael@doctors.org.uk.Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Greater Manchester, UK.Department of Urology, East Lancashire Hospital NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK.Department of Urology, East Lancashire Hospital NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK.Department of Urology, Rochdale Infirmary, Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, Whitehall Street, Rochdale, Greater Manchester, OL12 0NB, UK.Department of Urology, Rochdale Infirmary, Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, Whitehall Street, Rochdale, Greater Manchester, OL12 0NB, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

36031659

Citation

Michael, Kirolos G F T., et al. "Does the Mineral Content of Tap Water Correlate With Urinary Calculus Composition?" Urolithiasis, vol. 50, no. 6, 2022, pp. 691-699.
Michael KGFT, Michael S, Abusada E, et al. Does the mineral content of tap water correlate with urinary calculus composition? Urolithiasis. 2022;50(6):691-699.
Michael, K. G. F. T., Michael, S., Abusada, E., Srirangam, S. J., Bourdoumis, A., & Surange, R. (2022). Does the mineral content of tap water correlate with urinary calculus composition? Urolithiasis, 50(6), 691-699. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00240-022-01358-7
Michael KGFT, et al. Does the Mineral Content of Tap Water Correlate With Urinary Calculus Composition. Urolithiasis. 2022;50(6):691-699. PubMed PMID: 36031659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does the mineral content of tap water correlate with urinary calculus composition? AU - Michael,Kirolos G F T, AU - Michael,Sarah, AU - Abusada,Ehab, AU - Srirangam,Shalom J, AU - Bourdoumis,Andreas, AU - Surange,Raveendra, Y1 - 2022/08/28/ PY - 2022/07/03/received PY - 2022/08/20/accepted PY - 2022/8/29/pubmed PY - 2022/10/25/medline PY - 2022/8/28/entrez KW - Calculus composition KW - Tap water KW - Urolithiasis KW - Water hardness SP - 691 EP - 699 JF - Urolithiasis JO - Urolithiasis VL - 50 IS - 6 N2 - The association between the mineral content of drinking water and urolithiasis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the mineral composition of tap water correlates with urinary calculus composition. Patients with calculi that underwent biochemical analysis at two urological centres in the North-West of England between November 2015 and December 2020 were included. Calculus composition was reviewed with respect to patient demographics, serum biochemical variables, and water mineral composition data obtained from the local water supply company using patient postcodes. 1711 urinary tract calculi from 1518 patients, living in 87 water supply zones were included. Water sodium concentration was an independent predictor of mixed calcium oxalate/uric acid calculi (OR 1.157, p < 0.001) and a negative independent predictor of calcium oxalate monohydrate (OR 0.896, p = 0.001) and dihydrate (OR 0.742, p = 0.034) calculi. Moreover, the magnesium-to-calcium ratio of tap water was a negative independent predictor of calcium oxalate monohydrate calculi (OR < 0.001, p = < 0.001), while tap water magnesium concentration inversely correlated with the percentage of calcium oxalate within calculi (rs = - 0.054, p = 0.026). Total water hardness did not independently predict calculus type. Many factors are implicated in the formation of urinary calculi. This study is the first to assess calculus composition in relation to tap water mineral content using postcode data on a case-by-case basis. Though total water hardness did not independently predict calculus composition, the interesting findings relating to water sodium and magnesium concentrations are in need of closer scrutiny in larger scale studies. SN - 2194-7236 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/36031659/Does_the_mineral_content_of_tap_water_correlate_with_urinary_calculus_composition DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -