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Intestinal colonization and virulence of Salmonella in mice.
Infect Immun. 1978 Dec; 22(3):763-70.II

Abstract

Within 3 h after oral challenge of mice with Salmonella typhimurium, foci of infection developed in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. The numbers of organisms in the cecum, although in excess of those found in the small intestine, were not firmly associated with the cecal wall but were present largely in the cecum's contents. The Peyer's patches at first were remarkably incapable of eliminating even small numbers of Salmonella, but at about 7 days after infection developed the ability to eliminate a less virulent strain of S. typhimurium. Selected strains of Salmonella of varied virulence, and hybrid Escherichia coli/Salmonella typhimurium with varied O-antigens, revealed that those of low virulence could multiply within the intestinal Peyer's patches at nearly the same rate as a virulent strain, and the ability to multiply within the Peyer's patches was not dependent upon O-antigen type or smooth lipopolysaccharide. The ability of these strains to adhere to intestinal mucosa in vitro did not reflect on their ability to colonize the Peyer's patches, although strains of high in vitro adhesive ability appeared in greater numbers initially after oral challenge. Anti-O serum, ineffective in reducing the in vitro adhesive ability of virulent S. typhimurium, when given with the oral challenge prevented Peyer's patch colonization but was unable to prevent the appearance of a systemic infection. Anti-H serum, although effective in vitro in preventing adherence, had no effect in vivo. These experiments suggest that adhesiveness is neither essential nor sufficient for the virulence of Salmonella and that the usual development of a systemic infection after colonization of the small intestinal Peyer's patches may be subverted by the presence of O-antibody.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

365768

Citation

Hohmann, A W., et al. "Intestinal Colonization and Virulence of Salmonella in Mice." Infection and Immunity, vol. 22, no. 3, 1978, pp. 763-70.
Hohmann AW, Schmidt G, Rowley D. Intestinal colonization and virulence of Salmonella in mice. Infect Immun. 1978;22(3):763-70.
Hohmann, A. W., Schmidt, G., & Rowley, D. (1978). Intestinal colonization and virulence of Salmonella in mice. Infection and Immunity, 22(3), 763-70.
Hohmann AW, Schmidt G, Rowley D. Intestinal Colonization and Virulence of Salmonella in Mice. Infect Immun. 1978;22(3):763-70. PubMed PMID: 365768.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal colonization and virulence of Salmonella in mice. AU - Hohmann,A W, AU - Schmidt,G, AU - Rowley,D, PY - 1978/12/1/pubmed PY - 1978/12/1/medline PY - 1978/12/1/entrez SP - 763 EP - 70 JF - Infection and immunity JO - Infect Immun VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - Within 3 h after oral challenge of mice with Salmonella typhimurium, foci of infection developed in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. The numbers of organisms in the cecum, although in excess of those found in the small intestine, were not firmly associated with the cecal wall but were present largely in the cecum's contents. The Peyer's patches at first were remarkably incapable of eliminating even small numbers of Salmonella, but at about 7 days after infection developed the ability to eliminate a less virulent strain of S. typhimurium. Selected strains of Salmonella of varied virulence, and hybrid Escherichia coli/Salmonella typhimurium with varied O-antigens, revealed that those of low virulence could multiply within the intestinal Peyer's patches at nearly the same rate as a virulent strain, and the ability to multiply within the Peyer's patches was not dependent upon O-antigen type or smooth lipopolysaccharide. The ability of these strains to adhere to intestinal mucosa in vitro did not reflect on their ability to colonize the Peyer's patches, although strains of high in vitro adhesive ability appeared in greater numbers initially after oral challenge. Anti-O serum, ineffective in reducing the in vitro adhesive ability of virulent S. typhimurium, when given with the oral challenge prevented Peyer's patch colonization but was unable to prevent the appearance of a systemic infection. Anti-H serum, although effective in vitro in preventing adherence, had no effect in vivo. These experiments suggest that adhesiveness is neither essential nor sufficient for the virulence of Salmonella and that the usual development of a systemic infection after colonization of the small intestinal Peyer's patches may be subverted by the presence of O-antibody. SN - 0019-9567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/365768/Intestinal_colonization_and_virulence_of_Salmonella_in_mice_ L2 - https://journals.asm.org/doi/10.1128/iai.22.3.763-770.1978?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -