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The association of solar ultraviolet and skin melanoma incidence among caucasians in the United States.
Cancer Invest 1987; 5(4):275-83CI

Abstract

Using recent data from cancer incidence surveys and measures of UVB exposure levels at seven geographic locations within the United States, we estimate the dose-response relation between UVB and skin melanoma incidence. Mathematical models used information from general population interview studies conducted in these locations to adjust for potentially confounding factors such as age, skin color, ancestry, eye color, hair color, sunburn sensitivity, prevalence of moles, freckles, and hours spent outdoors, use of sunscreen/lotion, and other variables. The effect of geographic UVB exposure on incidence was found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.01) after adjusting for each variable and certain combinations of these variables. We found that incidence rates for those skin melanomas arising in the face, head, neck, or upper extremities (i.e, the most exposed sites) were more sensitive to UVB increases than the incidence rates for those lesions occurring in the ordinarily less exposed sites of the trunk and lower extremities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biostatistics Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3664331

Citation

Scotto, J, and T R. Fears. "The Association of Solar Ultraviolet and Skin Melanoma Incidence Among Caucasians in the United States." Cancer Investigation, vol. 5, no. 4, 1987, pp. 275-83.
Scotto J, Fears TR. The association of solar ultraviolet and skin melanoma incidence among caucasians in the United States. Cancer Invest. 1987;5(4):275-83.
Scotto, J., & Fears, T. R. (1987). The association of solar ultraviolet and skin melanoma incidence among caucasians in the United States. Cancer Investigation, 5(4), pp. 275-83.
Scotto J, Fears TR. The Association of Solar Ultraviolet and Skin Melanoma Incidence Among Caucasians in the United States. Cancer Invest. 1987;5(4):275-83. PubMed PMID: 3664331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of solar ultraviolet and skin melanoma incidence among caucasians in the United States. AU - Scotto,J, AU - Fears,T R, PY - 1987/1/1/pubmed PY - 1987/1/1/medline PY - 1987/1/1/entrez SP - 275 EP - 83 JF - Cancer investigation JO - Cancer Invest. VL - 5 IS - 4 N2 - Using recent data from cancer incidence surveys and measures of UVB exposure levels at seven geographic locations within the United States, we estimate the dose-response relation between UVB and skin melanoma incidence. Mathematical models used information from general population interview studies conducted in these locations to adjust for potentially confounding factors such as age, skin color, ancestry, eye color, hair color, sunburn sensitivity, prevalence of moles, freckles, and hours spent outdoors, use of sunscreen/lotion, and other variables. The effect of geographic UVB exposure on incidence was found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.01) after adjusting for each variable and certain combinations of these variables. We found that incidence rates for those skin melanomas arising in the face, head, neck, or upper extremities (i.e, the most exposed sites) were more sensitive to UVB increases than the incidence rates for those lesions occurring in the ordinarily less exposed sites of the trunk and lower extremities. SN - 0735-7907 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3664331/The_association_of_solar_ultraviolet_and_skin_melanoma_incidence_among_caucasians_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/skincancer.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -