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Initiating regular exercise protects against muscle atrophy from glucocorticoids.
J Appl Physiol (1985). 1987 Oct; 63(4):1504-10.JA

Abstract

This study was undertaken to examine whether exercise can prevent glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy in previously untrained individuals and to evaluate whether the time of hormone administration is a determinant in the muscle's response to glucocorticoids. Female rats were divided into five groups: 1) a sedentary group that received cortisol acetate (CA, 100 mg/kg body wt); 2) a sedentary group that received the dosing vehicle (1% aqueous carboxymethyl cellulose); 3) an exercise group that received CA immediately after each exercise session; 4) an exercise group that received CA 90 min after each exercise session; and 5) an exercise group that received the vehicle. Steroid treatment and exercise (28.7 m/min for 90 min/day) were performed for 11 consecutive days. Initiation of training prevented muscle mass loss by 60% in plantaris (P) muscles and by 25% in gastrocnemius (G) muscles. Time of steroid injection was not related to the muscle sparing response. In the glucocorticoid-treated exercised rats, the activities of citrate synthase, a training marker, increased 60% in P and 37% in G. Thus the exercise appeared to cause a greater recruitment of P muscles. These data support the hypothesis that entering into an exercise program can be effective in retarding glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. The degree of atrophy prevention, however, may be related to the extent that specific muscles are recruited during exercise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Education, University of Illinois, Chicago 60680.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3693188

Citation

Czerwinski, S M., et al. "Initiating Regular Exercise Protects Against Muscle Atrophy From Glucocorticoids." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 63, no. 4, 1987, pp. 1504-10.
Czerwinski SM, Kurowski TG, O'Neill TM, et al. Initiating regular exercise protects against muscle atrophy from glucocorticoids. J Appl Physiol (1985). 1987;63(4):1504-10.
Czerwinski, S. M., Kurowski, T. G., O'Neill, T. M., & Hickson, R. C. (1987). Initiating regular exercise protects against muscle atrophy from glucocorticoids. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 63(4), 1504-10.
Czerwinski SM, et al. Initiating Regular Exercise Protects Against Muscle Atrophy From Glucocorticoids. J Appl Physiol (1985). 1987;63(4):1504-10. PubMed PMID: 3693188.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Initiating regular exercise protects against muscle atrophy from glucocorticoids. AU - Czerwinski,S M, AU - Kurowski,T G, AU - O'Neill,T M, AU - Hickson,R C, PY - 1987/10/1/pubmed PY - 1987/10/1/medline PY - 1987/10/1/entrez SP - 1504 EP - 10 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J Appl Physiol (1985) VL - 63 IS - 4 N2 - This study was undertaken to examine whether exercise can prevent glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy in previously untrained individuals and to evaluate whether the time of hormone administration is a determinant in the muscle's response to glucocorticoids. Female rats were divided into five groups: 1) a sedentary group that received cortisol acetate (CA, 100 mg/kg body wt); 2) a sedentary group that received the dosing vehicle (1% aqueous carboxymethyl cellulose); 3) an exercise group that received CA immediately after each exercise session; 4) an exercise group that received CA 90 min after each exercise session; and 5) an exercise group that received the vehicle. Steroid treatment and exercise (28.7 m/min for 90 min/day) were performed for 11 consecutive days. Initiation of training prevented muscle mass loss by 60% in plantaris (P) muscles and by 25% in gastrocnemius (G) muscles. Time of steroid injection was not related to the muscle sparing response. In the glucocorticoid-treated exercised rats, the activities of citrate synthase, a training marker, increased 60% in P and 37% in G. Thus the exercise appeared to cause a greater recruitment of P muscles. These data support the hypothesis that entering into an exercise program can be effective in retarding glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. The degree of atrophy prevention, however, may be related to the extent that specific muscles are recruited during exercise. SN - 8750-7587 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3693188/Initiating_regular_exercise_protects_against_muscle_atrophy_from_glucocorticoids_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/jappl.1987.63.4.1504?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -