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Risk factors in the development of schizophrenia: contributions from a study of children of schizophrenic mothers.
Dan Med Bull. 1986 Jun; 33(3):127-33.DM

Abstract

The development of and the results from a prospective longitudinal study of children of schizophrenic mothers are presented. The presented studies have been guided by a diathesis-stress model of psychopathology and data analyses relied on the paradigm that schizophrenics and schizotypes share genetic liability to schizophrenia, but that the former, in addition, suffer from environmental insult. This paradigm, hypothetically formulated by Paul Meehl (21) proved especially fruitful in the etiological inferences made in this study. The results indicate that schizophrenia is, to some degree, genetically transmitted and that schizotypes share this genetic vulnerability with schizophrenics. Schizophrenia may be conceptualized as an environmentally complicated schizotypal personality disorder. Deleterious environmental influences identified in this study are obstetric complications probably resulting in central brain atrophy as measured by the CT-scans. In addition, future schizophrenics experienced disrupted childhood conditions as measured here by the amount of institutional rearing during the first five years of life. Fathers of the high risk children were more frequently mentally disturbed than fathers of the low risk children. The presence of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in the father significantly increased a risk for such disorder in the high risk offspring. Continuity of psychopathological deviance in the form of subtle formal thought disorder and defective emotional contact was demonstrated for the schizophrenics and schizotypes from childhood into adulthood. This suggests that such symptoms are central to schizophrenic psychopathology and that schizophrenia is a development and not a disease which affects people without forewarning.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3720363

Citation

Parnas, J. "Risk Factors in the Development of Schizophrenia: Contributions From a Study of Children of Schizophrenic Mothers." Danish Medical Bulletin, vol. 33, no. 3, 1986, pp. 127-33.
Parnas J. Risk factors in the development of schizophrenia: contributions from a study of children of schizophrenic mothers. Dan Med Bull. 1986;33(3):127-33.
Parnas, J. (1986). Risk factors in the development of schizophrenia: contributions from a study of children of schizophrenic mothers. Danish Medical Bulletin, 33(3), 127-33.
Parnas J. Risk Factors in the Development of Schizophrenia: Contributions From a Study of Children of Schizophrenic Mothers. Dan Med Bull. 1986;33(3):127-33. PubMed PMID: 3720363.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors in the development of schizophrenia: contributions from a study of children of schizophrenic mothers. A1 - Parnas,J, PY - 1986/6/1/pubmed PY - 1986/6/1/medline PY - 1986/6/1/entrez SP - 127 EP - 33 JF - Danish medical bulletin JO - Dan Med Bull VL - 33 IS - 3 N2 - The development of and the results from a prospective longitudinal study of children of schizophrenic mothers are presented. The presented studies have been guided by a diathesis-stress model of psychopathology and data analyses relied on the paradigm that schizophrenics and schizotypes share genetic liability to schizophrenia, but that the former, in addition, suffer from environmental insult. This paradigm, hypothetically formulated by Paul Meehl (21) proved especially fruitful in the etiological inferences made in this study. The results indicate that schizophrenia is, to some degree, genetically transmitted and that schizotypes share this genetic vulnerability with schizophrenics. Schizophrenia may be conceptualized as an environmentally complicated schizotypal personality disorder. Deleterious environmental influences identified in this study are obstetric complications probably resulting in central brain atrophy as measured by the CT-scans. In addition, future schizophrenics experienced disrupted childhood conditions as measured here by the amount of institutional rearing during the first five years of life. Fathers of the high risk children were more frequently mentally disturbed than fathers of the low risk children. The presence of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in the father significantly increased a risk for such disorder in the high risk offspring. Continuity of psychopathological deviance in the form of subtle formal thought disorder and defective emotional contact was demonstrated for the schizophrenics and schizotypes from childhood into adulthood. This suggests that such symptoms are central to schizophrenic psychopathology and that schizophrenia is a development and not a disease which affects people without forewarning.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0907-8916 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3720363/Risk_factors_in_the_development_of_schizophrenia:_contributions_from_a_study_of_children_of_schizophrenic_mothers_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6442 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -