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An outbreak and review of cave-associated histoplasmosis capsulati.
J Med Vet Mycol. 1986 Aug; 24(4):313-25.JM

Abstract

Three male college students from Florida developed acute onsets of fever, chills, shortness of breath, and cough within one day of each other, and all were eventually hospitalized for four to 29 days. All chest x-ray films showed diffuse reticulonodularities in both lung fields. Laboratory studies confirmed the diagnosis of histoplasmosis. The three students had been 'spelunking' (cave exploring) 6 to 7 days before their onset of symptoms. One of four soil samples collected in the caves was positive for Histoplasma capsulatum by the indirect mouse inoculation procedure. Of three investigators who entered the implicated caves, two developed acute febrile illness within 15-21 days. One investigator was hospitalized for 18 days with a confirmed diagnosis of histoplasmosis. Investigation identified an additional case (the person had entered the caves 6 months before this episode), but was not reported to health authorities. Spelunkers should be aware of the potential risk of histoplasmosis and how to avoid infection. Physicians should be cognizant of cave-associated histoplasmosis, inquire about spelunking in persons who develop febrile respiratory illnesses with diffuse nodularities on chest x-ray films, and report such cases to their health department. A review of 42 reported outbreaks of cave-associated histoplasmosis and the approach to environmental control of infected caves are included.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3746585

Citation

Sacks, J J., et al. "An Outbreak and Review of Cave-associated Histoplasmosis Capsulati." Journal of Medical and Veterinary Mycology : Bi-monthly Publication of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology, vol. 24, no. 4, 1986, pp. 313-25.
Sacks JJ, Ajello L, Crockett LK. An outbreak and review of cave-associated histoplasmosis capsulati. J Med Vet Mycol. 1986;24(4):313-25.
Sacks, J. J., Ajello, L., & Crockett, L. K. (1986). An outbreak and review of cave-associated histoplasmosis capsulati. Journal of Medical and Veterinary Mycology : Bi-monthly Publication of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology, 24(4), 313-25.
Sacks JJ, Ajello L, Crockett LK. An Outbreak and Review of Cave-associated Histoplasmosis Capsulati. J Med Vet Mycol. 1986;24(4):313-25. PubMed PMID: 3746585.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An outbreak and review of cave-associated histoplasmosis capsulati. AU - Sacks,J J, AU - Ajello,L, AU - Crockett,L K, PY - 1986/8/1/pubmed PY - 1986/8/1/medline PY - 1986/8/1/entrez SP - 313 EP - 25 JF - Journal of medical and veterinary mycology : bi-monthly publication of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology JO - J Med Vet Mycol VL - 24 IS - 4 N2 - Three male college students from Florida developed acute onsets of fever, chills, shortness of breath, and cough within one day of each other, and all were eventually hospitalized for four to 29 days. All chest x-ray films showed diffuse reticulonodularities in both lung fields. Laboratory studies confirmed the diagnosis of histoplasmosis. The three students had been 'spelunking' (cave exploring) 6 to 7 days before their onset of symptoms. One of four soil samples collected in the caves was positive for Histoplasma capsulatum by the indirect mouse inoculation procedure. Of three investigators who entered the implicated caves, two developed acute febrile illness within 15-21 days. One investigator was hospitalized for 18 days with a confirmed diagnosis of histoplasmosis. Investigation identified an additional case (the person had entered the caves 6 months before this episode), but was not reported to health authorities. Spelunkers should be aware of the potential risk of histoplasmosis and how to avoid infection. Physicians should be cognizant of cave-associated histoplasmosis, inquire about spelunking in persons who develop febrile respiratory illnesses with diffuse nodularities on chest x-ray films, and report such cases to their health department. A review of 42 reported outbreaks of cave-associated histoplasmosis and the approach to environmental control of infected caves are included. SN - 0268-1218 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3746585/An_outbreak_and_review_of_cave_associated_histoplasmosis_capsulati_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/histoplasmosis.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -