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Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation.
J Appl Physiol (1985). 1986 Sep; 61(3):967-70.JA

Abstract

This investigation was designed to determine the relationship between the levels of plasma aldosterone and eccrine sweat gland sodium excretion following exercise and heat acclimation. Ten subjects exercised at 45% of their maximal O2 uptake in a hot (40 degrees C), moderately humid (45% relative humidity) environment for 2 h/day on ten consecutive days. Acclimation was verified by significant reductions in exercise heart rate, rectal temperature, and heat storage, as well as significant elevation of resting plasma volume (12%, P less than 0.05) and exercise sweat rate on day 10 compared with day 1 of acclimation. During exercise, the concentration and total content of sodium in sweat as well as plasma aldosterone were significantly decreased from day 1 to day 10. The ratio of sweat sodium reabsorbed to plasma aldosterone concentration was significantly increased from day 1 to day 10 after both 1 and 2 h of exercise. These data indicate that plasma aldosterone concentrations decrease following heat acclimation; and eccrine gland responsiveness to aldosterone, as represented by sweat sodium reabsorption, may be augumented through exercise and heat acclimation.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3759782

Citation

Kirby, C R., and V A. Convertino. "Plasma Aldosterone and Sweat Sodium Concentrations After Exercise and Heat Acclimation." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 61, no. 3, 1986, pp. 967-70.
Kirby CR, Convertino VA. Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation. J Appl Physiol. 1986;61(3):967-70.
Kirby, C. R., & Convertino, V. A. (1986). Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 61(3), 967-70.
Kirby CR, Convertino VA. Plasma Aldosterone and Sweat Sodium Concentrations After Exercise and Heat Acclimation. J Appl Physiol. 1986;61(3):967-70. PubMed PMID: 3759782.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation. AU - Kirby,C R, AU - Convertino,V A, PY - 1986/9/1/pubmed PY - 1986/9/1/medline PY - 1986/9/1/entrez SP - 967 EP - 70 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J. Appl. Physiol. VL - 61 IS - 3 N2 - This investigation was designed to determine the relationship between the levels of plasma aldosterone and eccrine sweat gland sodium excretion following exercise and heat acclimation. Ten subjects exercised at 45% of their maximal O2 uptake in a hot (40 degrees C), moderately humid (45% relative humidity) environment for 2 h/day on ten consecutive days. Acclimation was verified by significant reductions in exercise heart rate, rectal temperature, and heat storage, as well as significant elevation of resting plasma volume (12%, P less than 0.05) and exercise sweat rate on day 10 compared with day 1 of acclimation. During exercise, the concentration and total content of sodium in sweat as well as plasma aldosterone were significantly decreased from day 1 to day 10. The ratio of sweat sodium reabsorbed to plasma aldosterone concentration was significantly increased from day 1 to day 10 after both 1 and 2 h of exercise. These data indicate that plasma aldosterone concentrations decrease following heat acclimation; and eccrine gland responsiveness to aldosterone, as represented by sweat sodium reabsorption, may be augumented through exercise and heat acclimation. SN - 8750-7587 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3759782/Plasma_aldosterone_and_sweat_sodium_concentrations_after_exercise_and_heat_acclimation_ L2 - http://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/jappl.1986.61.3.967?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -