Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant.
Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Nov; 69:119-27.EH

Abstract

Many drinking water utilities have recently changed or are seriously considering changing their disinfection practice from chlorine to some alternative treatment process. However, most of these utilities are changing their disinfectants without evaluating chemical impacts. Therefore, a research cooperative agreement was developed with Jefferson Parish, LA, to evaluate four parallel streams treated with four different disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone.) These streams, along with a fifth parallel stream, which was not treated with a disinfectant (control), were passed through both sand and granular activated carbon (GAC). Ozonation reduced the total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) concentration by 0.3 mg/L and 10 micrograms/L, respectively. The average concentration of TOC for the other disinfectants was comparable to that associated with the nondisinfected stream (3.3 mg/L). The average instantaneous TOX concentration for chlorine dioxide, chloramine, and chlorine disinfection after 30 min contact time increased by 60, 92, and 238 micrograms/L, respectively, from a nondisinfected concentration of 25 micrograms/L. The volatile organics most affected by disinfection (chlorination) were the trihalomethanes. No significant change in concentration was noted after disinfection for the other volatile organics evaluated, such as 1,2-dichlorethane, dichloromethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and carbon tetrachloride. Ozonation produced an average concentration reduction of 11 to 84% for most of the nonvolatiles evaluated. Conversely, a concentration increase of 43 to 100% was noted, after chlorination, for some of the nonvolatile organics.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3816717

Citation

Lykins, B W., and W Koffskey. "Products Identified at an Alternative Disinfection Pilot Plant." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 69, 1986, pp. 119-27.
Lykins BW, Koffskey W. Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant. Environ Health Perspect. 1986;69:119-27.
Lykins, B. W., & Koffskey, W. (1986). Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant. Environmental Health Perspectives, 69, 119-27.
Lykins BW, Koffskey W. Products Identified at an Alternative Disinfection Pilot Plant. Environ Health Perspect. 1986;69:119-27. PubMed PMID: 3816717.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Products identified at an alternative disinfection pilot plant. AU - Lykins,B W,Jr AU - Koffskey,W, PY - 1986/11/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1986/11/1/entrez SP - 119 EP - 27 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 69 N2 - Many drinking water utilities have recently changed or are seriously considering changing their disinfection practice from chlorine to some alternative treatment process. However, most of these utilities are changing their disinfectants without evaluating chemical impacts. Therefore, a research cooperative agreement was developed with Jefferson Parish, LA, to evaluate four parallel streams treated with four different disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone.) These streams, along with a fifth parallel stream, which was not treated with a disinfectant (control), were passed through both sand and granular activated carbon (GAC). Ozonation reduced the total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) concentration by 0.3 mg/L and 10 micrograms/L, respectively. The average concentration of TOC for the other disinfectants was comparable to that associated with the nondisinfected stream (3.3 mg/L). The average instantaneous TOX concentration for chlorine dioxide, chloramine, and chlorine disinfection after 30 min contact time increased by 60, 92, and 238 micrograms/L, respectively, from a nondisinfected concentration of 25 micrograms/L. The volatile organics most affected by disinfection (chlorination) were the trihalomethanes. No significant change in concentration was noted after disinfection for the other volatile organics evaluated, such as 1,2-dichlorethane, dichloromethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and carbon tetrachloride. Ozonation produced an average concentration reduction of 11 to 84% for most of the nonvolatiles evaluated. Conversely, a concentration increase of 43 to 100% was noted, after chlorination, for some of the nonvolatile organics. SN - 0091-6765 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3816717/Products_identified_at_an_alternative_disinfection_pilot_plant_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -