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Importance of differential diagnosis in acute vaginitis.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1985 Aug 01; 152(7 Pt 2):921-3.AJ

Abstract

Acute vaginitis is one of the most common diseases seen in the practice of office gynecology. Large survey studies of women with lower genital tract symptoms suggestive of vaginitis have demonstrated the presence of three major etiologic categories in acute vaginitis: (1) nonspecific vaginosis (Gardnerella vaginalis), (2) vulvovaginal candidiasis (Candida albicans), and (3) trichomoniasis (Trichomonas vaginalis). Effective treatment of acute vaginitis requires that an accurate diagnosis be established and etiologic microorganism(s) be identified. In general, the differential diagnosis of acute vaginitis does not rely on elaborate technology but, rather, requires inexpensive and readily available office equipment and supplies, a detailed history, and an adequate examination of the external genitalia, vagina, and cervix. Only after the etiology of vaginitis has been identified can appropriate therapeutic intervention(s) be utilized.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3875290

Citation

Sweet, R L.. "Importance of Differential Diagnosis in Acute Vaginitis." American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 152, no. 7 Pt 2, 1985, pp. 921-3.
Sweet RL. Importance of differential diagnosis in acute vaginitis. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1985;152(7 Pt 2):921-3.
Sweet, R. L. (1985). Importance of differential diagnosis in acute vaginitis. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 152(7 Pt 2), 921-3.
Sweet RL. Importance of Differential Diagnosis in Acute Vaginitis. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1985 Aug 1;152(7 Pt 2):921-3. PubMed PMID: 3875290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Importance of differential diagnosis in acute vaginitis. A1 - Sweet,R L, PY - 1985/8/1/pubmed PY - 1985/8/1/medline PY - 1985/8/1/entrez SP - 921 EP - 3 JF - American journal of obstetrics and gynecology JO - Am J Obstet Gynecol VL - 152 IS - 7 Pt 2 N2 - Acute vaginitis is one of the most common diseases seen in the practice of office gynecology. Large survey studies of women with lower genital tract symptoms suggestive of vaginitis have demonstrated the presence of three major etiologic categories in acute vaginitis: (1) nonspecific vaginosis (Gardnerella vaginalis), (2) vulvovaginal candidiasis (Candida albicans), and (3) trichomoniasis (Trichomonas vaginalis). Effective treatment of acute vaginitis requires that an accurate diagnosis be established and etiologic microorganism(s) be identified. In general, the differential diagnosis of acute vaginitis does not rely on elaborate technology but, rather, requires inexpensive and readily available office equipment and supplies, a detailed history, and an adequate examination of the external genitalia, vagina, and cervix. Only after the etiology of vaginitis has been identified can appropriate therapeutic intervention(s) be utilized. SN - 0002-9378 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3875290/Importance_of_differential_diagnosis_in_acute_vaginitis_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/haemophilusinfections.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -